Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Numeric Value and Percentage Value in a Graph Column.

Numeric Value and Percentage Value in a Graph Column

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 28, 2017)

Harrie wants to create a column chart that displays two values for each column in the chart. One value to be displayed would be a percentage (such as 46%) and the other an absolute value (such as 359,000). One value would appear on the column in the chart, and the other just above the column.

There are many ways that this can be accomplished, depending on the nature of your data. This tip will examine a couple of the many ways you can proceed.

A relatively simple approach is to assume that your data is in three columns. The first column is the category (what will appear along the X-axis), the second is the percentage that you want to plot, and the third is the absolute value to be displayed. Follow these steps:

  1. Select all three columns of data.
  2. Display the Insert tab of the ribbon.
  3. Click the Column tool and then choose the clustered column chart type. Excel creates a chart based upon this selection. It displays the percentage on the Y-axis, but there are two sets of Y-coordinate data that are plotted.
  4. Right-click the second data series (the "exact amount" values) and choose Add Data Labels from the resulting Context menu. Excel displays the data labels above each column of the data series.
  5. Right-click the second data series again and choose Format Data Series from the resulting Context menu. Excel displays the Format Data Series dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  6. Figure 1. The Series Options of the Format Data Series dialog box.

  7. Click Secondary Axis.
  8. Click Fill at the left of the dialog box.
  9. Click No Fill.
  10. Click Border Color at the left of the dialog box.
  11. Make sure No Line is selected.
  12. Click Close. You now have the absolute values displayed, yet you've hidden the graph column in which they would normally be displayed.
  13. Right-click the second Y-axis (the one on the right) and choose Format Axis from the resulting Context menu. Excel displays the Format Axis dialog box.
  14. Set the Major Tick Mark Type drop-down list to None.
  15. Set the Minor Tick Mark Type drop-down list to None.
  16. Set the Axis Labels drop-down list to None.
  17. Click Close. The secondary axis should now be gone from the graph.
  18. Right-click one of the data labels (the absolute values) and choose Format Data Labels from the resulting Context menu. Excel displays the Format Data Labels dialog box.
  19. Select the Center radio button.
  20. Click Close. The data labels should now be vertically centered within each column.
  21. Right-click the remaining data series (the percentage values) and choose Add Data Labels from the resulting Context menu. The percentage value should now appear above each column.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (7888) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Numeric Value and Percentage Value in a Graph Column.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Flashing Cells

Want to draw attention to some information in a particular cell? Make the cell flash, on and off. Here's how you can ...

Discover More

Finding the Size of a Workbook

Keeping tabs on the size of a workbook can be important when using Excel. You have a couple of options that will allow ...

Discover More

Disabling Page Layout View

Excel allows you to display your workbooks using a couple of different views. If you want to disable one of the views, it ...

Discover More

Save Time and Supercharge Excel! Automate virtually any routine task and save yourself hours, days, maybe even weeks. Then, learn how to make Excel do things you thought were simply impossible! Mastering advanced Excel macros has never been easier. Check out Excel 2010 VBA and Macros today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Changing the Axis Scale

When creating a chart, you may want to adjust the default scaling that Excel applies to an axis. This is relatively easy ...

Discover More

Make that Chart Quickly!

Need to generate a chart in the fastest possible way? Just use this shortcut key and you'll have one faster than you can ...

Discover More

Changing Chart Types

Want to change an existing bar chart to a different type of chart, such as a line chart or a column chart? It's easy to ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is eight less than 8?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.