Loading
ExcelRibbon.Tips.Net ExcelTips (Ribbon Interface)

Pulling All Fridays

Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Pulling All Fridays.

When developing a worksheet to track business information, you may have a need to determine all the Fridays in a range of dates. The best way to do this depends on the data in your worksheet and the way in which you want results displayed.

If you have a list of dates in a column, you can use several different worksheet functions to determine whether those dates are Fridays or not. The WEEKDAY function returns a number, 1 through 7, depending on the weekday of the date used as an argument:

=WEEKDAY(A2)

This usage returns the number 6 if the date in A2 is a Friday. If this formula is copied down next to a column of dates, you could then use the AutoFilter feature of Excel to show only those dates where the weekday is 6 (Friday).

You could also use the conditional formatting feature of Excel to simply highlight all the Fridays in a list of dates. Follow these steps:

  1. Select the list of dates.
  2. Make sure the Home tab of the ribbon is displayed.
  3. Click the Conditional Formatting tool. Excel displays a series of choices.
  4. Click New Rule. Excel displays the New Formatting Rule dialog box.
  5. In the Select a Rule Type area at the top of the dialog box, choose Use a Formula to Determine Which Cells to Format. (See Figure 1.)
  6. Figure 1. The New Formatting Rule dialog box.

  7. In the formula area enter the following formula, replacing A2 with the address of the active cell selected in step 1: =WEEKDAY(A2)=6
  8. Click Format to display the Format Cells dialog box.
  9. Set the formatting options to highlight the Fridays as desired.
  10. Click OK to dismiss the Format Cells dialog box.
  11. Click OK.

If you want to determine a series of Fridays based on a beginning and ending date, you can set up a series of formulas to figure them out. Assuming that the beginning date is in A2 and the ending date is in A3, you can use the following formula to figure out the date of the first Friday:

=IF(A2+IF(WEEKDAY(A2)<=6,6-WEEKDAY(A2),6)>A3,
"",A2+IF(WEEKDAY(A2)<=6,6-WEEKDAY(A2),6))

If you place this formula in cell C2 and then format it as a date, you can use the following formula to determine the next Friday in the range:

=IF(C2="","",IF(C2+7>$A$3,"",C2+7))

If you copy this formula down for a bunch of cells, you end up with a list of Fridays between whatever range of dates is specified by A2 and A3.

If you actually want to "pull" Fridays in a specific date range, then you will need to use a macro. There are several ways you can go about this. This simple macro will examine all the dates in the range A2:A24. If they are Fridays, then the date is copied into column C, beginning at C2. The result, of course, is that the list starting at C2 will only contain dates that are Fridays.

Sub PullFridays1()
    Dim dat As Range
    Dim c As Range
    Dim rw As Integer

    Set dat = ActiveSheet.Range("A2:A24")
    rw = 2
    For Each c In dat
        If Weekday(c) = vbFriday Then
            Cells(rw, 3).Value = Format(c)
            rw = rw + 1
        End If
    Next
End Sub

If desired, you can change the range examined by the macro simply by changing the A2:A24 reference, and you can change where the dates are written by changing the value of rw (the row) and the value 3 (the column) in the Cells function.

If you would rather work with a beginning date and an ending date, you can modify the macro so that it will step through the dates. The following macro assumes that the beginning date is in cell A2 and the ending date is in cell A3.

Sub PullFridays2()
    Dim dStart As Date
    Dim dEnd As Date
    Dim rw As Integer

    dStart = Range("A2").Value
    dEnd = Range("A3").Value

    rw = 2
    While dStart < dEnd
        If Weekday(dStart) = vbFriday Then
            Cells(rw, 3).Value = dStart
            Cells(rw, 3).NumberFormat = "m/d/yyyy"
            rw = rw + 1
        End If
        dStart = dStart + 1
    Wend
End Sub

The macro still pulls the Fridays from the range and places them into a list starting at C2.

Another macro approach is to create a user-defined function that returns specific Fridays within a range. The following does just that:

Function PullFridays3(dStartDate As Date, _
                      dEndDate As Date, _
                      iIndex As Integer)
    Dim iMaxDays As Integer
    Dim dFirstday As Date

    Application.Volatile
    If dStartDate > dEndDate Then
        PullFridays3 = CVErr(xlErrNum)
        Exit Function
    End If

    dFirstday = vbFriday - Weekday(dStartDate) + dStartDate
    If dFirstday < dStartDate Then dFirstday = dFirstday + 7
    iMaxDays = Int((dEndDate - dFirstday) / 7) + 1

    PullFridays3 = ""
    If iIndex = 0 Then
        PullFridays3 = iMaxDays
    ElseIf iIndex <= iMaxDays Then
        PullFridays3 = dFirstday + (iIndex - 1) * 7
    End If
End Function

You use this function in a cell in your worksheet in the following manner:

=PULLFRIDAYS3(A2,A3,1)

The first argument for the function is the starting date and the second is the ending date. The third argument indicates which Friday you want returned from within the specified range. If you use 1, you get the first Friday, 2 returns the second Friday, etc. If you use a 0 for the third argument, then the function returns the number of Fridays in the specified range. If the specified beginning date is greater than the ending date, then the function returns a #NUM error.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (8147) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Pulling All Fridays.

Related Tips:

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

 

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form below!)

Leave your own comment:

*Name:
Email:
  Notify me about new comments ONLY FOR THIS TIP
Notify me about new comments ANYWHERE ON THIS SITE
Hide my email address
*Text:
*What is 3+4? (To prevent automated submissions and spam.)
 
          Commenting Terms
 
 

Our Company

Sharon Parq Associates, Inc.

About Tips.Net

Contact Us

 

Advertise with Us

Our Privacy Policy

Our Sites

Tips.Net

Beauty and Style

Cars

Cleaning

Cooking

DriveTips (Google Drive)

ExcelTips (Excel 97–2003)

ExcelTips (Excel 2007–2013)

Gardening

Health

Home Improvement

Money and Finances

Organizing

Pests and Bugs

Pets and Animals

WindowsTips (Microsoft Windows)

WordTips (Word 97–2003)

WordTips (Word 2007–2013)

Our Products

Premium Newsletters

Helpful E-books

Newsletter Archives

 

Excel Products

Word Products

Our Authors

Author Index

Write for Tips.Net

Copyright © 2014 Sharon Parq Associates, Inc.