Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Spreading Out a Table.

Spreading Out a Table

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 22, 2019)

3

Sometimes you may get a worksheet from someone else, and you need some room to work on the information provided. For instance, you may find it helpful to add some blank rows between each of the original rows in a data table. While this can be done rather easily using the Insert menu, it can quickly become tedious—particularly if you have a large table that you want to spread out.

The following macro will help you tremendously in this situation. All you need to do is select the first row in the data table. When you run the macro, it asks you how many blank rows you want to insert between the original rows. When you provide a number, the macro steps through the table and starts inserting blank rows. The macro stops when the first blank cell after the original table is detected.

Sub SpreadOut()
    Dim iBlanks As Integer
    Dim J As Integer
	
    iBlanks = InputBox("How many blank rows?", "Insert Rows")
    ActiveCell.Offset(1, 0).Select
    While ActiveCell.Value > "" And iBlanks > 0
        For J = 1 To iBlanks
            Selection.EntireRow.Insert
        Next J
        ActiveCell.Offset(iBlanks + 1, 0).Select
    Wend
End Sub

Note:

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ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (10005) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Spreading Out a Table.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 9 - 4?

2014-07-28 08:25:26

Jeff C

Dave's solution works but the original tip allows for multiple rows to be inserted between each original row.

As Barry stated, I would avoid inserting rows like this. The undo stack shouldn't be a concern for a simple macro like this. You can always copy the worksheet before running it.


2014-07-26 10:04:19

Dave Onorato

No need to write a macro for this easy operation.
1. Insert a new "A" column. Put "asort" as a header field name
2. With autofill put odd numbers down the column, 1, 3, 5, 7,...
3. At the end of your data, note the end number, and continue numbering the A column, but with even numbers, 2, 4, 6, ... If your data ended with 157, then even number to 158.
4. Sort the table by the asort A column.
5. Delete the A column.

Fast, easy, no problematic code or macro, and totally undoable.


2014-07-26 05:25:06

Barry

I would prefer not to insert blank rows like this as subsequent "table" operations can get confused, and give misleading results.

I would suggest that increasing the row height would be a better way that can be simply done by selecting the whole table (select a cell in the table then press Crtl+Shift+8) then drag a row boundary in the row header bar to the desired height or right click in the row headers bar and select "Row Height....." and key the precise hieght you want then "OK".

Using the macro also deletes the "Undo" stack, which makes reversing the operation far more difficult.


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