Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Getting User Input in a Dialog Box.

Getting User Input in a Dialog Box

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 9, 2016)

3

If you need to get input from a user under control of a macro, one method you can use is to employ the InputBox function. This function displays a dialog box and allows the user to type a response. The result is a string, returned to your macro, which you can then process and use.

The syntax for the InputBox function is as follows:

sResponse = InputBox(sPrompt, sTitle, sDefault)

There are three parameters you can use with InputBox (each of them strings), although only the first one is absolutely required. In this syntax, sPrompt is the text you want displayed as the user prompt, sTitle is the text to display in the title bar of the dialog box, and sDefault is the default text string offered to the user in the dialog box. The user can edit or accept the default string, as desired.

As an example, the following code lines can be used to display a dialog box and ask the user for his or her name:

Dim sUserName as String
Dim sPrompt as String
Dim sTitle as String
Dim sDefault as String

sPrompt = "Please check your name and make any corrections"
sTitle = "Name Entry"
sDefault = "John Doe"
sUserName = InputBox(sPrompt, sTitle, sDefault)

When this code is completed, the sUserName variable contains whatever the user entered. You can then, in your macro, use that input in any other way that you see fit.

The InputBox function is great for grabbing one piece of data at a time, as you can only post a single "question" using it. If you need to get a bunch of user input for use in your macro, then you'll need to rely either on a UserForm or grab the input directly from a worksheet. (Both approaches have been discussed in other ExcelTips.)

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11416) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Getting User Input in a Dialog Box.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is five more than 8?

2018-05-03 08:01:40

Willy Vanhaelen

@Lee Wolf
Try:
*** "Z:\SALES\SALES REPORTS\" & sBackDate, FileFormat:= _
xlOpenXMLWorkbookMacroEnabled, CreateBackup:=False


2018-05-02 14:16:44

Lee Wolf

Is there a way to pass sUserName to a string in a filename? Such as below where I define sBackDate in place of sUserName. The string below (indicated with ***) does not work with or without the "=" sign. Any help would be appreciated.

Dim sBackDate As String
Dim sPrompt As String
Dim sTitle As String
Dim sDefault As String

sPrompt = "Please erase date and enter last Saturday's date backwards"
sTitle = "Backwards Date Entry"
sDefault = "19620515 Raw Data.xlsm"
sBackDate = InputBox(sPrompt, sTitle, sDefault)
ChDir "Z:\SALES\SALES REPORTS"
ActiveWorkbook.SaveAs Filename:= _
*** "Z:\SALES\SALES REPORTS\=sBackDate", FileFormat:= _
xlOpenXMLWorkbookMacroEnabled, CreateBackup:=False


2016-07-10 20:19:03

Mark Fitzgerald

There is also an Application.InputBox method which can be used to return validated data of various types - formulas, numbers, text, logicals, ranges, error values and arrays.


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