Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Disappearing Status Bar.

Disappearing Status Bar

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 8, 2020)

Catherine uses keystrokes where she can (instead of the mouse) and she seems to periodically hit a key combination which makes the status bar disappear. She has yet to discover what the keystroke combination is or how to get the status bar back without shutting Excel down and restarting.

The only way that this can happen in Excel 2007 or later versions is through the use of a macro. This is because the capability to turn off the status bar, which was present in earlier versions of Excel, was removed starting with Excel 2007. (A user cannot turn it off, but a macro can.)

Thus, if your status bar is disappearing as you are using Excel, then it stands to reason that there is a macro on your system that is being triggered (perhaps by a shortcut key you are pressing) and the macro is turning off the status bar. You'll need to do some poking through your macros to see if this is, indeed, the case. Specifically, as you are poking about, you'll want to look for a line that looks similar to this:

Application.DisplayStatusBar = False

If the macro executes such a line without later setting the DisplayStatusBar property to True, then you won't see your status bar.

There is another macro-related possible cause for the problem, as well. If you don't use macros in your workbooks, yet you work with workbooks that come from others, it is possible that their workbooks are the root of the problem because they may contain macros. If you suspect this as a possible cause, try these steps:

  1. Press Alt+F11. Excel opens the Visual Basic Editor.
  2. Press Ctrl+G. The Immediate window opens in the Visual Basic Editor.
  3. Type the following into the Immediate window and press Enter:
  4. Application.DisplayStatusBar = True
    
  5. Press Alt+Q. The Visual Basic Editor closes, and you are returned to Excel.

If this doesn't work and there are no macros, then it is most possible that you are pressing, in sequence, a shortcut such as Alt+W, E. This puts Excel into full-screen mode, which means that the worksheet takes up the maximum possible space on the screen. In this mode the status bar is not displayed. You can get out of this viewing mode by simply pressing Esc at any time.

Another technique to try is to click on the File tab of the ribbon and then go back to your worksheet. Some ExcelTips readers advised that this method works when their status bar disappears.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9144) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Disappearing Status Bar.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Too-Big Toolbars

Work around Words inability to have a multi-row toolbar.

Discover More

Hiding Graphics when Filtering

Excel allows you to set up graphics so that they are associated with cells and even stay with the cells when the cells ...

Discover More

Printing A4 on Letter Size Paper

For those around the world using the metric system, the standard size for many documents is referred to as an A4 page. If ...

Discover More

Save Time and Supercharge Excel! Automate virtually any routine task and save yourself hours, days, maybe even weeks. Then, learn how to make Excel do things you thought were simply impossible! Mastering advanced Excel macros has never been easier. Check out Excel 2010 VBA and Macros today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Forcing Stubborn Recalculation

Have you ever recalculated a worksheet, only to notice that not everything calculated as it should? Here's a way you can ...

Discover More

Relative Worksheet References

Copy a formula from one place to another and Excel helpfully adjusts the cell references within the formula. That is, it ...

Discover More

Disabling the F1 Key

Tired of hitting the F1 key by mistake and pulling up the Help system? Here are a couple of ways (one drastic and one not ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is seven more than 6?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.