Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: How Many Rows and Columns Have I Selected?.

How Many Rows and Columns Have I Selected?

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 10, 2017)

6

As I am typing along in Excel, I find it a bother to take my hands off the keyboard and fumble for the mouse. Thus, I will often use the keyboard to make selections. I simply hold down the Shift key and use the arrow keys to expand my selection. As I do so, Excel obliges me by reporting, in the Name box, the number of rows and columns I have selected.

The problem is, once I let go of the Shift key, the contents of the Name box return to normal, and I can no longer tell how many rows and columns I selected. To solve this, I find it very easy to again hold down the Shift key and press one of the arrow keys. This expands the selected range and again reports the selection size in the Name box. If I immediately press the opposite arrow key (while still holding down the Shift key), the selection returns to my original size and I can see the size of that selection in the Name box.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (8849) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: How Many Rows and Columns Have I Selected?.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Setting Tab Stops Using the Tabs Dialog Box

Aligning different lines in your document is easy. Using the tab stops feature in Word, you can set four different types of ...

Discover More

Printing a Bookmark List

Need to know what bookmarks are defined in a document? Here's a macro that creates a list of all your bookmarks so that you ...

Discover More

Adding Serial Commas in a Sentence

Part of the job of an editor is to apply standards of grammar to text written by someone else. One standard that may need to ...

Discover More

Professional Development Guidance! Four world-class developers offer start-to-finish guidance for building powerful, robust, and secure applications with Excel. The authors show how to consistently make the right design decisions and make the most of Excel's powerful features. Check out Professional Excel Development today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Accepting Only a Single Digit

Want a quick way to enter a series of single digits into consecutive cells? The best approach is with a macro, and this tip ...

Discover More

Adjusting a Range's Starting Point

Select a range of cells, and one of those cells will always be the starting point for the range. This tip explains how to ...

Discover More

Pasting without Updating References

Do you need to paste formulas without updating the references in whatever you are pasting? You can accomplish this, depending ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 3 + 8?

2017-10-11 10:20:47

Gary Lundblad

Thank you Chuck! That helped. I was looking in the wrong place.

Thanks again for clarifying!

Gary


2017-10-10 23:48:52

Chuck Trese

Gary,
You have to have the Formula Bar active (In 2013, Ribbon -> "View" tab -> "Show" group -> "Formula Bar" checkbox should be checked). When your formula bar is visible, the "Name" box is visible to the left of the Formula Bar. The number of selected cells is visible there, but only as you are holding down the shift key (or left-mouse-button) while selecting cells. when you select enough to have to scroll off screen, Excel stops displaying it in the Name box, and displays it at the corner of the selection where you are expanding the selection. So, while expanding your selection down-and-right, it will be displayed at bottom-right corner of the selection.


2017-10-10 10:43:54

Gary Lundblad

I'm using Excel 2016 and have no idea what this tip is referring to. I do not see any indication of how many cells I have selected. There must be an option to turn this on and off. Can you provide some direction to do so?

Thank you!

Gary


2017-02-17 04:56:26

JPA

It is a tipp indeed.
But kind of a sloppy solution.

MS should implement an indicator of the total numbe of chosen cells. As Libreoffice does. Where the total number and not only the product (10Rx4C) is given.

Hopefully waiting for that.


2013-09-24 23:12:50

Tony

Tammy,

Are you selecting a very large area? Beyond a certain size it no longer shows in the name box. You can see it at the bottom right corner of the selected area as you continue to expand.


2013-09-23 16:07:23

Tammy

I am using Excel 2010 and do not see the total appearing in the name box. Do I need to turn on an option anywhere?


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.