Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Setting Row Height in a Macro.

Setting Row Height in a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 12, 2019)

3

It is not unusual to use macros to process data and format output in a workbook. If you use macros to do this type of work, you may be interested in changing the height of a row using a macro. If so, you should pay attention to the RowHeight property. This property, when applied to a Row object, indicates the height of the row in points.

For instance, the following code snippet steps through the rows in a selection and sets the height of each row to 36 points (one-half inch):

For Each r In ActiveWindow.RangeSelection.Rows
    r.RowHeight = 36
Next r

If you prefer not to step through each of the rows, you could use the following single line to adjust the row height:

Selection.RowHeight = 36

Either approach sets the height of all the rows that were selected when the code is executed. If you want your macro to adjust a specific range of rows, then you can specify the rows directly in the code:

ActiveSheet.Rows("3:34").RowHeight = 36

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9239) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Setting Row Height in a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is two more than 2?

2018-09-04 07:20:33

Andrea Carr

Thanks, Gregg

I'll try t by at out soon, but it sure looks like it would work well.

Andrea


2018-09-03 12:08:49

gregg

Hi Andrea,

I am building a project management tool and was wanting to set row heights as needed for wrapped cells. With some help, I came up with this code which works without any problems I've seen

'adjust row height if wraps
Rows(ActiveCell.row).EntireRow.Select
Dim CL As Range
'Range.CurrentArray.Select
Range("F" & (ActiveCell.row)).Select
If ActiveCell.WrapText Then Rows(ActiveCell.row).AutoFit
If ActiveCell.WrapText Then Rows(ActiveCell.row).AutoFit
With Range("F" & ActiveCell.row)
.RowHeight = .RowHeight + 5
End With

Range("G" & (ActiveCell.row)).Select
If ActiveCell.WrapText Then Rows(ActiveCell.row).AutoFit
With Range("G" & ActiveCell.row)
.RowHeight = .RowHeight + 5
End With


2018-08-31 07:32:19

Andrea Carr

I've enjoyed your tips for years and learned much about
Excel. So thank you.

I think a follow up tip about this subject would be great. It would be great to learn more about the interaction between row height and wrap text. The auto format row height and wrap text often do not work well together. So I wonder if setting row height in VBA is a better way.

Andrea


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