Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Setting Row Height in a Macro.

Setting Row Height in a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 30, 2019)

4

It is not unusual to use macros to process data and format output in a workbook. If you use macros to do this type of work, you may be interested in changing the height of a row using a macro. If so, you should pay attention to the RowHeight property. This property, when applied to a Row object, indicates the height of the row in points.

For instance, the following code snippet steps through the rows in a selection and sets the height of each row to 36 points (one-half inch):

For Each r In ActiveWindow.RangeSelection.Rows
    r.RowHeight = 36
Next r

If you prefer not to step through each of the rows, you could use the following single line to adjust the row height:

Selection.RowHeight = 36

Either approach sets the height of all the rows that were selected when the code is executed. If you want your macro to adjust a specific range of rows, then you can specify the rows directly in the code:

ActiveSheet.Rows("3:34").RowHeight = 36

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9239) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Setting Row Height in a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is five more than 8?

2021-04-14 12:00:03

J. Woolley

@Rachel
I will try to fix the first part of my previous comment here:

The first two code snippets in the Tip use RangeSelection and Selection. In either case, to set the height of rows 26, 31, 36:
1. Click the mouse to select any cell in row 26.
2. Ctrl+Click the mouse to select any cell in row 31.
3. Ctrl+Click the mouse to select any cell in row 36.
4. Run the macro.
Using Ctrl+Click adds each individual cell to the Selection.

Also, see https://sites.google.com/view/MyExcelToolbox/


2021-04-14 06:41:07

Harold Druss

Every 5th row should be:
For r = 5 To 50 Step 5
Rows(r).RowHeight = 80
Next


2021-04-13 12:41:44

J. Woolley

@Rachel The first two code snippets in the Tip use RangeSelection and Selection. In either case, to set the height of rows 26, 31, 36:1. Click the mouse to select any cell in row 26.2. Ctrl+Click the mouse to select any cell in row 31.3. Ctrl+Click the mouse to select any cell in row 36.4. Run the macro.Using Ctrl+Click adds each individual cell to the Selection.To set the height to 80 for every 5th row from 1 to 1001:For r = 1 To 1001 Step 5    Rows(r).RowHeight = 80Next rAlso, see https://sites.google.com/view/MyExcelToolbox/


2021-04-12 13:22:17

Rachel K

What about using the multiple row codes for rows that aren't connected? I want to set the row height for row 26, 31, 36. Do I have to do that individually? Futhermore, is there a way to automate every "certain" row as a specific height? Every 5th row as 80 for example? Thanks


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