Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Printing an Entire Workbook by Default.

Printing an Entire Workbook by Default

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 13, 2014)

2

When you choose to print in Excel, the Print dialog box (Excel 2007) or the File tab of the ribbon (later versions of Excel) allows you to specify many things about the print job. The Print What drop-down list allows you to indicate whether you want to print the selected worksheets, the selection, or the entire workbook. The Print What setting normally defaults to Active Worksheets, but what if you want it to default so the entire workbook is printed?

Unfortunately, Excel does not remember what you select using the Print What controls from one print job to the next; it always resets the default. The easiest way to always print the entire workbook, however, it to make a simple little macro like this:

Sub PrintItAll()
    ActiveWorkbook.PrintOut
End Sub

You can then create a button on the Quick Access Toolbar and assign this macro to that button. When you want to print the entire workbook, just click on the button. Easy and quick.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (10918) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Printing an Entire Workbook by Default.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 8 - 2?

2017-02-10 11:12:24

Peter Atherton

Mike

Macros are written in the Visual Basic Editior (VBE) which can be accessed on the Developer's TAb. If that is not shown then go to Excel Options,Popular and click Show Developer Tab in the Ribbon.

To access the VBE press ALT + F11, Insert, Module. You can now paste the code into the module; press ALT + Q to close the Editor an return to the spreadsheet page.

To run the macro press ALT + F8 to see a list of all the macros in the workbook. Select one and click Run.

Adding a Button
Alan has a page on adding buttons to a sheet in the macros section, But quickly:
1. Choose Developer Tab, Controls, Insert drop button; the first control is a Form command Click this.
2 Draw the button onto the sheet and this opns the Assign Macro Form. Select the macro name and choose OK.
3 While the Button is still actice change the text (if you missed this out you can right-click the button and choose Edit Text, or reassign the buton to another macro

Finally, Allan has just started a macro tutorial.get signed up. I looked at the first lesson (Recording macros) and it was very impressive,


2017-02-09 17:06:22

mike

would you kindly explain how to do the rest of the operations. make a macro, make a button, etc?

Thank you


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