Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Full Path Names in Excel.

Full Path Names in Excel

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 2, 2018)

4

When you open a workbook in Excel, the workbook name is displayed in the title bar. At times, it would be nice to display more than a simple workbook name in the title bar. Many people could profit by a way to display a full path name along with the workbook name in the title bar. Unfortunately, Excel does not provide a way to do this easily.

If you only need to know the full path name once in a while, then you can create a very simple macro and assign it to the QAT or a shortcut key. When you run the macro, the information in the title bar for the active window is changed to reflect the full path name. This macro, called ChangeCaption, is as follows:

Sub ChangeCaption()
     ActiveWindow.Caption = ActiveWorkbook.FullName
End Sub

The only drawback to this approach is that whenever you rename your workbook by saving it under a different name, the new file name (and path) are not updated in the title bar unless you rerun the macro.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (7850) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Full Path Names in Excel.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is two more than 9?

2018-06-04 21:02:52

Julie

You can always add to your page layout for reporting purposes (or just to look at if you are using). Go to Page Layout tab, click the little arrow at the right bottom corner of Page Setup, choose Header/Footer tab, the Custom Footer, and maybe in the right section put your cursor and add the Insert File Path (little folder icon)/Insert File Name (Excel icon). Now you can always see it if you print it out.


2018-06-04 12:15:02

Steven

It is also possible to add the filename to one's Quick Access Toolbar. Select Customize QAT, More Commands. On the list on the left, under Choose Commands From, select Commands Not in the Ribbon. Choose Document Location.
This will always show the path for the current file in the QAT. Depending on how many commands you have in your QAT and your window size, this path listing may be truncated.


2018-06-03 09:39:23

Rhonda Landry

I don't know if this is at all helpful (I'm more of a beginner user), but I wanted to be able to add the full-path name of my current file to my list of files to work on later, so I added the file's full-path to the Quick Access Toolbar. One must click the name to be able to see the actual path (and perhaps arrow over a bit), so it's a bit of a pain, but it is easy for me to click on the name, copy, then paste where I need it. To do this (for other beginners): > File > Options >Customize > Commands Not in Ribbon > Document Location > Add, OK. Thank you so very, very, very much for your tips, and to all the commenters, from an avid learner :-)


2018-06-02 08:30:18

Dave

The other drawback is there is not enough room title bar to show the path if you have other commands there. It would be nice to have it display at the end of the line with the commands tabs since there is more space there.


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