Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Adding a Custom Format to those Offered by Excel.

Adding a Custom Format to those Offered by Excel

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 4, 2017)

5

When you display the Format Cells dialog box (Home tab of the ribbon, click the small icon at the bottom-right of the Number group) and click Custom on the Number tab, Excel displays a list of custom formats. Some of these formats are provided by Excel by default, and others reflect custom formats used within the current workbook.

If you spend some time developing a custom format, it would be helpful to have that format always appear in the list of custom formats, regardless of which workbook you are using. Unfortunately, that is not in the cards for Excel; it lists only those custom formats unique to the current workbook.

There are a couple of workarounds, however. The first is a natural extension to what is already mentioned in this tip—that the custom list includes any custom formats that have been defined in the current workbook. This means that you could replace Excel's default workbook with one of your own, and the custom format will be available in the list provided the format was defined in the workbook you saved as the default.

Sound confusing? It doesn't need to; all you need to do is start with a brand new workbook and define the custom format. Then, save the workbook as a template (under the name Book.xltx) or macro-enabled template (under the name Book.xltm) in the XLStart folder. (Use Windows' Search tool to look locate the XLStart folder.) This template file then becomes the basis for all new workbooks, which means the custom format will be available in them. It will not affect any existing workbooks.

One problem with using the default-workbook approach is that the custom format, while included in the list, is at the bottom of the list. Unfortunately, there is no way to get your own preferred set of custom formats at the top of the list. There is a quick way to get exactly the custom formats you want, however—use macros.

Seriously, you can create a macro that applies a custom format of any desired type. The macro can be stored with individual workbooks or stored in the Personal.xlsb workbook so it is available to all workbooks on a system. You can use shortcut keys with the macro so that the format can be applied with a single keypress, or you can assign the macro to a toolbar button or custom menu so that it can be applied using the mouse.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (7992) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Adding a Custom Format to those Offered by Excel.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is seven less than 7?

2017-05-05 10:59:20

Terence

I like the macro route personally, I have a modified version of the accounting format in my Personal.xlsb, added to the quick access bar and accessible through my alt + 6 (numpad). Extremely useful, saves so much time.


2017-05-04 06:14:07

Michael (Micky) Avidan

@Mark,
This information *is* 100% correct.
You can find and CF a cell (within your Template) which is not within your normal working area.
In addition you may try to CF, one cell, in your PERSONAL Workbook which is, normally, a Hidden file and check if the CF remains available, in the CF list, for all other (Old/New) workbooks.
--------------------------
Michael (Micky) Avidan
“Microsoft® Answers" - Wiki author & Forums Moderator
“Microsoft®” MVP – Excel (2009-2017)
ISRAEL


2016-04-07 21:23:34

Mark

This information is not 100% correct. If one creates a custom format, at least one cell must be formatted using that custom format or excel will not retain it. That makes trying to create a default-workbook difficult. I just want the format available, but want the workbook to be created initially with all of the cells with the General format. These statements are in regard to Excel 2010.


2016-01-26 17:31:02

Ralph

You can also copy a cell with the desired format from one workbook to another. This cell format will then appear in the custom format list in the second workbook.


2013-03-30 06:17:39

Tim Reinhard

Hi Allen,

I have purchased a few products from you and receive your excel tips (thank you!). I am studying for my forensic accounting certification and work as a consultant (performing financial analysis) for a restaurant chain (165 stores - both casual dining and fast food). Do you have or can you recommend software (that is not to expensive) that will assist me in either one of these endeavors? Thank you again for the tips and your time.

Tim


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