Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Determining the Hour of the Day.

Determining the Hour of the Day

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 17, 2017)

1

If you are writing macros for Excel, you may have a need to determine the hour represented by a particular date and time value. For instance, you might want to know the hour of the day in which the macro is running. You can ascertain this information by using the HOUR function, as follows:

iThisHour = Hour(Now())

When executed, iThisHour will be equal to the current hour number, which ranges from 0 to 23. Notice that this example uses the Now() function. If you want to determine the hour number for a different date and time value, simply substitute that value in place of the Now() function.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9009) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Determining the Hour of the Day.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is three less than 9?

2013-10-15 10:07:47

Bryan

In VBA you don't need to include the parentheses if there are no arguments, so Hour(Now) is the same as Hour(Now()). There's no harm in leaving them, other than you might be tempted to put in an argument where there is none.

In contrast, in Excel you must use the parentheses, as this is how Excel knows you are referencing a function. =HOUR(NOW()) will give you the correct result, whereas =HOUR(NOW) will display the #NAME? Error.


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