Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Turning Off Screen Updating.

Turning Off Screen Updating

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 14, 2020)

4

Many people write their own macros to manipulate the information in a workbook. Many times, the macro may do quite a bit with the data, such as selecting different cells, replacing values or formulas, and taking other types of actions. This means that the Excel screen can look like it has "gone crazy" while the macro is running.

One thing you may want to do with your macro to make it run faster and to prevent distracting flashes on the screen is to turn off screen updating while the macro is running. The following macro lines will, respectively, turn off screen updating and then turn it back on in a VBA macro.

Application.ScreenUpdating = False
Application.ScreenUpdating = True

The idea is to use the first line near the beginning of your macro, and then use the second line near the end. Thus, the main body of your macro can do its work behind the scenes without the necessity of stopping to update the screen.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9151) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Turning Off Screen Updating.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 9 + 6?

2020-04-30 10:43:22

J. Woolley

@Seriously Stressed
I have noticed that Application.ScreenUpdating = False "appears" to be ignored if my code Activates a worksheet or Selects a Range on a worksheet. I'm not sure which was the cause, but when I avoided both the problem went away. As many have noted, it should not be necessary to Activate or Select unless you want the object to be viewed (and the screen updated). See the 2nd paragraph of this post #25 in the thread cited by Peter Atherton:
http://www.vbforums.com/showthread.php?460281-Application-ScreenUpdating-false-does-not-work&p=4935447&viewfull=1#post4935447


2020-04-30 04:19:55

Peter Atherton

Seriously Stressed
Here are a couple of links that deal with this problem,
http://www.vbforums.com/showthread.php?460281-Application.ScreenUpdating-false-does-not-work
https://www.excelforum.com/excel-programming-vba-macros/1306608-that-durn-screen-flicker.html#post5280766

The second thread by Logit, said he solved the problem. I hope it works for you. Incidently, do you also set calculation to manual when start the porocedure and reset it at the end.


2020-04-29 11:06:20

Seriously Stressed

Recently this feature stopped working. I have no explanation why, but it has devastated the speed of all my workflows. Do you have any clue why this code would just stop working?


2020-03-16 05:22:59

David Shepherd

If using this in a procedure it is always a good idea to include an error trap to set screenupdating back to True in the event of an error arising in the code.


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