Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Setting Column Width in a Macro.

Setting Column Width in a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 2, 2019)

1

It is not unusual to use macros to process data and format output in a workbook. If you use macros to do this type of work, you may be interested in changing the width of a column using a macro. If so, you should pay attention to the ColumnWidth property. This property, when applied to a Column object, indicates the width of the column in characters, based on the current font settings.

For instance, the following code snippet steps through the columns in a selection and sets the width of each column to 10 characters:

For Each c In ActiveWindow.RangeSelection.Columns
    c.ColumnWidth = 10
Next c

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9333) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Setting Column Width in a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 8 + 1?

2019-11-03 03:08:40

Thomas Papavasileiou

I frequently use a fairly large columns range with dates in dd/mmm/yy format and the "column width, best fit" option may result in a slightly different column withs, I wrote a macro that checks all the column widths in the range and sets that width to the maximum value registered.

The advantage of this formatting is purely a display that does not change when I scroll to the right of the sheet.

Macro also checks the maximum allowed by Excel column width and has a fancy answer as an ending message

If anyone may be interested, here is the macro

Sub idem_2_max_col_width()
If Selection.Columns.Count < 2 Then
ttl = "What a narrow selection..."
txt = "Selection is one columns wide." & vbCr & vbCr
txt = txt & "Macro ends."
MsgBox txt, vbOKOnly + vbInformation, ttl
Exit Sub
End If

mx = 0
With Selection
.Columns.AutoFit
sc = .Column
ec = .Columns.Count + sc - 1
End With
ad1 = Cells(1, sc).Address
sc_ = Mid(ad1, InStr(ad1, "$") + 1, InStr(2, ad1, "$") - 2)
ad2 = Cells(1, ec).Address
ec_ = Mid(ad2, InStr(ad2, "$") + 1, InStr(2, ad2, "$") - 2)
For i = sc To ec
mx = Application.WorksheetFunction.Max(mx, Columns(i).ColumnWidth)
' Debug.Print i, Columns(i).ColumnWidth
Next
If mx > 254 Then
ttl = "Maximum column width is 255..."
txt = "Macro detects a column larger then 254 and stops" & vbCr
txt = txt & "without any width modification "
MsgBox txt, vbOKOnly + vbCritical, ttl
Exit Sub
End If
Selection.ColumnWidth = mx
ttl = "Succesfull rum..."
txt = "Width of " & ec - sc + 1 & " columns " & sc_ & " to " & ec_ & " is identical and equal to " & mx
MsgBox txt, vbOKOnly + vbInformation, ttl
End Sub


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