Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Shortcut to Move between Two Worksheets.

Shortcut to Move between Two Worksheets

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 27, 2021)

4

You can easily move between worksheets in a workbook by using Ctrl+Pg Up and Ctrl+Pg Down. What if you want to use a shortcut to move between two specific, non-neighboring worksheets, such as Sheet1 and Sheet4? In this case, it is best to use a macro to do the jumping around.

If desired, you could define two macros that would do the jumping. One macro would jump to Sheet1 and the other to Sheet4. These would be easy enough to create using the macro recorder, and you could assign a shortcut key to each of the macros.

If you are looking for a single shortcut that will toggle between the two worksheets, then you can use a macro such as this:

Sub JumpBetween1()
    If ActiveSheet.Name = "Sheet1" Then
        Worksheets("Sheet4").Activate
    Else
        Worksheets("Sheet1").Activate
    End If
End Sub

The macro simply checks to see which worksheet is currently displayed. If it is Sheet1, then Sheet4 is displayed. In all other instances, Sheet1 is displayed. This is handy, but it means that if you currently have Sheet2 displayed, the shortcut will always display Sheet1. You might not want the macro to do anything unless either Sheet1 or Sheet4 is displayed. In that case, you should use this variation of the macro:

Sub JumpBetween2()
    If ActiveSheet.Name = "Sheet1" Then
        Sheets("Sheet4").Activate
    ElseIf ActiveSheet.Name = "Sheet4" Then
        Sheets("Sheet1").Activate
    End If
End Sub

Note that the only difference between the two macros is that the latter variation uses ElseIf to check if Sheet4 is displayed. This means that if any worksheets other than Sheet1 or Sheet4 is displayed, the macro will do nothing.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9669) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Shortcut to Move between Two Worksheets.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is eight more than 0?

2021-03-29 05:10:03

David Shepherd

@Cliff Raymond

Good point. If "Sheet1" and "Sheet4" are both worksheets then it'll make no difference, but if one and/or the other happens to be a Chart sheet then example 1 may cause problems.


2021-03-29 05:00:24

Daniel Watters

These can be placed in your Personal Macro Workbook to allow switching to your previous sheet, within any workbook. Sadly I can't remember where it came from.

'Put in Module; allows switching to last worksheet - needs code in ThisWorkbook too
Public oldsheet As String
Public newSheet As String

Sub oldsheet_act()
On Error Resume Next
Worksheets(oldsheet).Activate
End Sub


'Put in ThisWorkbook:
Public WithEvents xlAPP As Application

Private Sub Workbook_Open()
Set xlAPP = Application
newSheet = ActiveSheet.Name
Application.OnKey "^e", "OldSheet_act"
'will return to prior sheet on pressing Ctrl+e (key can be changed); needs section in Module too
End Sub

Private Sub xlAPP_SheetActivate(ByVal Sh As Object)
oldsheet = newSheet
newSheet = Sh.Name
End Sub


2021-03-27 12:13:53

Rick Rothstein

Another way to move between sheets is to right-click the "VCR-like" buttons located to the left of the sheet tabs... doing so will allow you to navigate to any sheet in the workbook.


2021-03-27 11:14:11

Cliff Raymond

You neglect to explain why you used the Worksheets object in example 1 and the Sheets object in example 2.


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