Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Jumping to the Real Last Cell.

Jumping to the Real Last Cell

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 23, 2014)

Diane wrote about a problem she was having with a file imported into Excel. The file, created by a non-Excel program, contains 50,000 records, but only the first 87 records contain any data. When the file is imported, pressing Ctrl+End moves to cell J50000 instead of cell J87. Diane was wondering how to make Excel jump to the end of the real data—J87.

The first thing to try is to simply save your workbook, get out of Excel, and then reopen the workbook. Doing so "resets" the end-of-data pointer in the workbook, and you should be fine.

If that doesn't solve the problem, then it is very likely that the data you imported into Excel included non-printing characters, such as spaces. If these are loaded into cells, Excel sees them as data, even though you don't. To fix the workbook by deleting the data, select row 88 (the one right after your data) and then hold down the Shift and Ctrl keys as you press the Down Arrow. All the rows from 88 through the last row in th worksheet should be selected. Press the Delete key, save the workbook, and reopen it. Ctrl+End should work fine.

If you have quite a few of these files you need to "clean up," or if you need to do it on a regular basis, then you need a macro to help you. Consider the following macro:

Sub ClearEmpties()
    Dim c As Range
    Dim J As Long

    J = 0
    Selection.SpecialCells(xlCellTypeConstants, 23).Select
    For Each c In Selection.Cells
        J = J + 1
        StatusBar = J & " of " & Selection.Cells.Count
        c.Value = Trim(c.Value)
        If Len(c.Value) = 0 Then
            c.ClearFormats
        End If
    Next
    StatusBar = ""
End Sub

This macro selects all the cells in the worksheet that contain constants (in other words, they don't contain formulas). It then steps through each of those cells and uses the Trim function to remove any leading or trailing spaces from the contents. If the cell is then empty, any formatting is cleared from the cell.

When the macro is done, you can save and close the workbook, reopen it, and you should be able to use Ctrl+End to go to the real end of your data. If this still doesn't work, it means that the cells being imported into the workbook have some other invisible, non-printing character in them. For instance, there could be some bizarre control characters in the cells. In this case, you need to talk with whoever is creating your import file. The best solution, at this point, would be for the person to modify their program so it doesn't include the "trash" that Excel is mistaking for valid cell content.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9811) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Jumping to the Real Last Cell.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Limiting Number of Characters in a Cell

Need to limit the number of characters that can be entered into a cell? One easy way to do it is through the use of Data ...

Discover More

Automatically Copying Formatting

It's easy to automatically set the contents of one cell to be equal to another cell. But what if you want to copy the ...

Discover More

Field Reference to Number of Prior Pages

Fields are used for all sorts of purposes in Word, but typically to provide some sort of dynamic information. This tip shows ...

Discover More

Program Successfully in Excel! John Walkenbach's name is synonymous with excellence in deciphering complex technical topics. With this comprehensive guide, "Mr. Spreadsheet" shows how to maximize your Excel experience using professional spreadsheet application development tips from his own personal bookshelf. Check out Excel 2013 Power Programming with VBA today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (RIBBON)

Inadvertantly Getting Rid of Frozen Panes

Excel provides quite a bit of flexibility in displaying your data. You can have multiple windows visible for the same ...

Discover More

Embedding Your Phone Number in a Workbook

Want to provide a bit of contact information in a workbook? A great place to do it (out of sight, but not inaccessible) is in ...

Discover More

Understanding R1C1 References

Referring to cells is typically done using a letter and a number, which represent the column and row. That's not the only way ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share