Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Running a Macro When a Worksheet is Deactivated.

Running a Macro when a Worksheet is Deactivated

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 30, 2015)

1

It is possible to configure Excel so that a macro of your choosing is executed every time a particular worksheet is deactivated. What does that mean? Simply that a macro can be run every time you click on a worksheet tab to leave the current sheet. All you need to do is follow these steps:

  1. Activate the worksheet with which you want the macro associated.
  2. Make sure the Formulas tab of the ribbon is displayed.
  3. In the Defined Names area of the ribbon, click Define Name. Excel displays the New Name dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The New Name dialog box.

  5. In the Name field, enter a name that begins with the worksheet name, followed by an exclamation point, Auto_Deactivate, and any other wording desired. Thus, if the worksheet were named Stocks, you might enter Stocks!Auto_Deactivate_Exit.
  6. In the Refers to box, enter a formula that points to the workbook and macro you want automatically executed. Thus, if the macro name were Update_PL, and the workbook name were PFOLIO.XLS, you would enter the formula =PFolio!Update_PL.
  7. Click on the OK button.

Remember that a macro defined in this way is run every time the worksheet is deactivated, not just the first time. Think about how you use Excel; if you spend a fair amount of time hopping between worksheets in a workbook or between workbooks, it is possible to deactivate a worksheet several dozen times during the course of a session.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (6138) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Running a Macro When a Worksheet is Deactivated.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Replacing a Group on a Ribbon Tab

Don't like the way that the ribbons are arranged? Getting them changed can be more of a challenge than you may want to ...

Discover More

Converting Endnotes to Regular Text

If you have a document with lots of endnotes, you may need them converted to regular text so that they can be used properly ...

Discover More

Shrinking Cell Contents

Need to cram a bunch of text all on a single line in a cell? You can do it with one of the lesser-known settings in Excel.

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (RIBBON)

Inserting the Current Time with Seconds

If you need to insert the current time, with seconds, then you'll need the macro discussed in this tip. It's easy to use and ...

Discover More

Getting a File Name

Does your macro need to allow the user to specify a particular file name that should be used by the macro? Here's a quick ...

Discover More

Deleting Every X Rows

Grab some info from a source other than Excel, and you may find the need to delete a certain pattern of rows from a ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 7 + 8?

2015-05-30 08:14:05

Col Delane

This is more complex than necessary - there is no need to create a Defined Name as described. Simply execute the macro from a Worksheet_Deactivate event macro attached to the sheet being left. That is, in the Project window of the
Visual Basic Editor, click on the "Stocks" sheet in the list of Microsoft Excel Objects, and then in the code window enter the following:

Private Sub Worksheet_Deactivate()
Call Update_PL
End Sub


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing