Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, Excel in Microsoft 365, and 2021. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Printing Columns and Rows.

Printing Columns and Rows

Written by Allen Wyatt (last updated January 1, 2022)
This tip applies to Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, Excel in Microsoft 365, and 2021


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Brent asked if it was possible to print a single column and a single row from a worksheet on the same piece of paper. (His boss wanted to see just the "crossed" information.) Unfortunately, there is no intrinsic way within Excel to specify to print only a single column and a single row. If you select both the column and row you want to print, and then choose to print just the selection, Excel still treats them as separate selections and prints them in that way. There are a couple of workarounds, however.

The first approach is to simply "hide" the information you don't want to print by setting its font color to white. You can do that by following these general steps:

  1. Choose the first range of cells you don't want to appear on the printout.
  2. Change the color of the text in those cells to white.
  3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each range you don't want on the printout.
  4. Print your worksheet as normal.
  5. Select the entire worksheet (press Ctrl+A).
  6. Change the color of the text in the cells to Automatic.

Another approach is to copy the row and column to a different worksheet. This is quick and easy to do using the keyboard (Ctrl+C to copy and Ctrl+V to paste), but there is a drawback. If the row or column you are copying contains formulas that rely on other areas of the worksheet, the copied data will not show the proper results. Thus, the best "cut and paste" approach would be as follows:

  1. Insert a new, blank worksheet in your workbook.
  2. Switch to the worksheet that contains the row and column you want to copy.
  3. Select the column you want to copy and press Ctrl+C.
  4. Switch to the new worksheet and select the column where you want it pasted.
  5. Display the Home tab of the ribbon.
  6. Click the small down-arrow under the Paste tool, near the left edge of the ribbon, and then choose Paste Values.
  7. Switch back to the worksheet that contains your original data.
  8. Select the row you want to copy and press Ctrl+C.
  9. Switch to the new worksheet and select the row where you want it pasted.
  10. Again paste the information by following steps 5 and 6.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9549) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, Excel in Microsoft 365, and 2021. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Printing Columns and Rows.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is nine minus 3?

2022-01-04 11:16:05

J. Woolley

Ronmio's suggestion is excellent. "Copy as picture..." is in the Clipboard section of the Home ribbon (Alt+H+C+P). Note that it makes a static image.
For a dynamic image, consider the Camera tool described in these articles:
https://excelchamps.com/blog/camera-tool/
https://trumpexcel.com/excel-camera-tool/
https://excelribbon.tips.net/T008189_Multiple_Print_Areas_on_a_Single_Printed_Page.html
https://excelribbon.tips.net/T008315_Printing_Multiple_Worksheets_on_a_Single_Page.html
For an equivalent of the Camera tool, copy (Ctrl+C) a region of the active sheet, then select another cell on any sheet and pick Home > Paste > Linked Picture (Alt+H+V+I).
My Excel Toolbox includes the following two macros to create an image of a range of cells. In addition to cell values, the images will include visible portions of shapes or charts from the copied range.
1. SelectionImage copies the selected range as a static image on the clipboard and optionally saves it in a file.
2. DynamicImage copies the selected range and pastes it as a dynamic image in any sheet of any workbook. All changes visible in the source range will be reproduced in the dynamic image (assuming the source is open in Excel). The result is a simple dashboard.
See https://sites.google.com/view/MyExcelToolbox/


2022-01-03 14:55:40

Ronmio

Another option is to use the "Copy as picture" tool. Just insert a new "printout" worksheet and paste pictures of each of the desired rows, columns, ranges onto that worksheet. (What ever you have as part of a selection at the time that you "Copy as picture" becomes a single picture.) As pictures, each resulting object can be independently rearranged, resized, recolored, given a drop-shadow, etc. It is a very flexible way to create a more custom printout and has none of the drawbacks of the two methods described in the main article..


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