Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Correcting a Capital Mistake.

Correcting a Capital Mistake

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 1, 2020)

3

I can't tell you the number of times that I've been feverishly typing away, without glancing up at my worksheet. I get in a "groove," and I keep typing away, figuring I will check things out when I get to the end of a row or a column. When I finally look up, I notice that I had the Caps Lock key selected, so all my normal text is in uppercase, and everything I wanted in upper case is in lowercase. This happened because I hit the Caps Lock key by mistake, and didn't notice the mistake until I'd already entered quite a bit of data.

Fortunately, Excel can catch this type of mistake for me—if I tell it to catch it. Follow these steps:

  1. Display the Excel Options dialog box. (In Excel 2007 click the Office button and then click Excel Options. In Excel 2010 or a later version, display the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. Click Proofing at the left side of the screen. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Proofing options of the Excel Options dialog box.

  4. Click AutoCorrect Options. Excel displays the AutoCorrect dialog box.
  5. Display the AutoCorrect tab. (See Figure 2.)
  6. Figure 2. The AutoCorrect tab of the AutoCorrect dialog box.

  7. Make sure the Correct Accidental Use of cAPS LOCK Key check box is selected.
  8. Click on OK.

Now, if I type something in a cell and the first letter is lowercase and the rest of the letters are uppercase, Excel figures that I've got the Caps Lock key selected, and helpfully turns it off. It also corrects the capitalization of my text entry.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (10631) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Correcting a Capital Mistake.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 9 - 8?

2019-01-12 09:55:50

Jim C

Ok tried it and it does not, pity


2019-01-11 06:49:11

Don H

Try it and see.


2019-01-11 03:45:40

Jim C

Does this work if the text is pasted into a sheet?


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