Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Wildcards in 'Replace With' Text.

Wildcards in 'Replace With' Text

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 31, 2015)

Anne-Mie realizes that she can use wildcards (*?) to search in Excel, but she wonders if she can use wildcards in the replace string. For instance, she would like to search for "ab*de" and replace it with "aa*de", where the asterisk represents any number of characters, or none at all.

The short answer is that there is no way to do this in Excel, as described. If you only wanted to convert the second character of a text value from "b" to "a", then that can be done rather easily:

=REPLACE(A1,2,1,"a")

This, however, is probably not what you want to do; you want a way to use wildcards in the "replace with" text. The technical term for doing such string replacements is called REGEX, which is short for Regular Expressions. REGEX started with languages like Perl but was so powerful that many other programming languages added it on.

The VBA used in Excel is no exception. The first step in using REGEX is to turn it on. You do this in the VBA Editor by choosing Tools | References and then making sure there is a check mark next to the Microsoft VBScript Regular Expressions option. If there is more than one version of the reference available, pick the latest version.

Enabling this reference allows you to create REGEX objects. Technically you could leave it turned off, depending on how you want binding to occur in your macros. A discussion on the pros and cons of late vs. early binding is beyond the scope of this tip, however, so just go ahead and turn on the REGEX reference.

REGEX objects possess a Test method and a Pattern property. This means that you set the Pattern property and then the Test method checks to see if the pattern exists. A REGEX object also has a Replace method, which is used to do replacements.

Before proceeding, it is important to understand that regular expressions can get very complex and, well, "geeky." There is no way around it; how to work with regular expressions has been the subject of entire books. Fortunately, for the purposes of this tip, the expressions are rather simple in nature. In this case we'll use the pattern "^ab.*de$". This pattern refers to a word that starts (indicated by the ^) with "ab" followed by an arbitrary expression (indicated by *) consisting of at least one character (indicated by the period) and ending (indicated by the $) with "de".

Here is the code that implements the use of the REGEX object to do the actual replacements.

Public Function SearchNReplace1(Pattern1 As String, _
  Pattern2 As String, Replacestring As String, _
  TestString As String)
    Dim reg As New RegExp

    reg.IgnoreCase = True
    reg.MultiLine = False
    reg.Pattern = Pattern1
    If reg.Test(TestString) Then
        reg.Pattern = Pattern2
        SearchNReplace1 = reg.Replace(TestString, ReplaceString)
    Else
        SearchNReplace1 = TestString
    End If
End Function

To use this macro, start with the strings you want to change in column A. Assuming that the first string is in cell A1, you could place the following into another cell in order to get the changed text:

=SearchNReplace1("^ab.*de$","^ab","aa",A1)

This tells the macro that the pattern you want to look for is "^ab.*de$" (the first parameter), and that you want to replace "^ab" with "aa". This formula can be pasted down the column, and you end up with a conversion of column A where the string "ab*de" is replaced by "aa*de".

If you would prefer not to use REGEX expressions in VBA for some reason, then you can create a macro that will simply step through a group of selected cells and look for any cell that begins with "ab" and ends with "de", and then replaces the beginning part with "aa".

Sub SearchNReplace2()
    Dim sFindInitial As String
    Dim sReplaceInitial As String
    Dim iLenInitial As Integer
    Dim sFindFinal As String
    Dim sReplaceFinal As String
    Dim iLenFinal As Integer
    Dim sTemp As String
    Dim rCell As Range

    sFindInitial = "ab"
    sReplaceInitial = "aa"
    sFindFinal = "de"
    sReplaceFinal = "de"

    For Each rCell In Selection
        sTemp = rCell.Value
        iLenInitial = Len(sFindInitial)
        iLenFinal = Len(sFindFinal)
        If Left(sTemp, iLenInitial) = sFindInitial And _
            Right(sTemp, iLenFinal) = sFindFinal Then
            sTemp = Mid(sTemp, iLenInitial + 1)
            sTemp = Left(sTemp, Len(sTemp) - iLenFinal)
            sTemp = sReplaceInitial & sTemp & sReplaceFinal
            rCell.Value = sTemp
        End If
    Next
    Set rCell = Nothing
End Sub

To use this routine, simply select the cells you want to change, and then execute the macro. You should also make changes to the sFindInitial, sReplaceInitial, sFindFinal, and sReplaceFinal variables, as needed.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11170) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Wildcards in 'Replace With' Text.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Self-Aware Macros

Sometimes it may be helpful for a macro to know exactly where it is being executed. This tip provides a way that you can ...

Discover More

Delivery Address Won't Print on Envelopes

Word includes a feature that allows you to easily create and print envelopes, based on the addresses you insert in your ...

Discover More

Unwanted Vertical Lines in a Table

When you print a table that includes borders, those borders should be crisp and clear on the printout. If you get some ...

Discover More

Save Time and Supercharge Excel! Automate virtually any routine task and save yourself hours, days, maybe even weeks. Then, learn how to make Excel do things you thought were simply impossible! Mastering advanced Excel macros has never been easier. Check out Excel 2010 VBA and Macros today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Find and Replace in Headers

Using Find and Replace is something quite routine in Excel, as it easily allows you to find and replace information in your ...

Discover More

A Fast Find-Next

Tired of the Find and Replace dialog box blocking the view of your worksheet when you are searching for information? Do what ...

Discover More

Replacing Only Whole Words in Excel

Excel's Find and Replace capabilities are handy, but they aren't as full-featured as those in Word. One shortcoming is the ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 8 - 2?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.