Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Microsoft 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Sheets for Days.

Sheets for Days

Written by Allen Wyatt (last updated April 11, 2024)
This tip applies to Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Microsoft 365


3

When you are starting a new workbook, it is very common to name each worksheet after a different day of the month. If you do this quite a bit, you know it can be tiresome to rename each worksheet, individually, to exactly what you need.

The following macro was developed to help in these situations. It checks the names of the worksheets in your workbook, renaming them to the days of the month if they begin with the letters "Sheet". If there are not enough sheets in the workbook, it adds sheets, as necessary, for each day of the month.

Sub DoDays()
    Dim J As Integer
    Dim K As Integer
    Dim sDay As String
    Dim sTemp As String
    Dim iTarget As Integer
    Dim dBasis As Date

    iTarget = 13
    While (iTarget < 1) Or (iTarget > 12)
        iTarget = Val(InputBox("Numeric month?"))
        If iTarget = 0 Then Exit Sub
    Wend

    Application.ScreenUpdating = False
    sTemp = Str(iTarget) & "/1/" & Year(Now())
    dBasis = CDate(sTemp)
    
    For J = 1 To 31
        sDay = Format((dBasis + J - 1), "dddd mm-dd-yyyy")
        If Month(dBasis + J - 1) = iTarget Then

            If J <= Sheets.Count Then
                If Left(Sheets(J).Name, 5) = "Sheet" Then
                    Sheets(J).Name = sDay
                Else
                    Sheets.Add.Move after:=Sheets(Sheets.Count)
                    ActiveSheet.Name = sDay
                End If
            Else
                Sheets.Add.Move after:=Sheets(Sheets.Count)
                ActiveSheet.Name = sDay
            End If
        End If
    Next J

    For J = 1 To (Sheets.Count - 1)
        For K = J + 1 To Sheets.Count
            If Right(Sheets(J).Name, 10) > _
              Right(Sheets(K).Name, 10) Then
                Sheets(K).Move Before:=Sheets(J)
            End If
        Next K
    Next J

    Sheets(1).Activate
    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
End Sub

Note that the macro assumes that the month for which you want worksheets is in the current year. If that is not the case, you'll need to make one small change. Note the following line near the beginning of the macro:

    sTemp = Str(iTarget) & "/1/" & Year(Now())

Let's say that you actually want the month to be in 2015 for some reason. Just change the line to the following:

    sTemp = Str(iTarget) & "/1/2015"

The macro sets each tab name equal to the day of the week followed by the actual date, as in "Wednesday 03-28-2020." If you want to change the way that the tabs are named for each day, just change how the sDay variable is constructed in the macro.

The last step in the macro is that it places the worksheets in proper order, based on the days of the month. The result is that if you have any other worksheets left in the workbook (in other words, you had some that did not begin with the letters "Sheet," then those worksheets end up at the end of the workbook, after the sheets for each day.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11523) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Microsoft 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Sheets for Days.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is three less than 9?

2021-04-30 06:09:03

Willy Vanhaelen

@Cam
I don't know if your request is still valid but here it is:

Sub doDays()
Dim D As Integer, M As Integer
M = Val(InputBox("Numeric month?"))
If M < 1 Or M > 12 Then Exit Sub
For D = 1 To Day(DateSerial(Year(Now), M + 1, 0))
Worksheets("Template").Copy before:=Sheets("Template") ').Name = S
ActiveSheet.Name = Format(DateSerial(Year(Now), M, D), "ddd mm.dd.yy")
Next D
End Sub

Note that my 9 lines macro does the job equally well as the 42 lines macro in this tip.
If your template worksheet has another name, just replace "Template" in the macro with "your name".


2021-01-05 13:54:45

Cam

Can this be modified to create the sheets from a template?


2020-08-12 20:02:16

Giancarlo

Hi Allen, I appreciate your macro post above. I copied and pasted in Visual Basic (firs time using it) and I'm almost there to get what I need but not quite. I have a master worksheet log which I need to complete every day of the year Monday-Friday and I would like that master worksheet copied exactly for every day of every month of the year and again the same thing for all of 2021. After I copied the macro you posted above, my master was showing under the August 1, 2020 tab. I would appreciate your help


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