Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Automating Copying Macros.

Automating Copying Macros

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 8, 2017)

Sreekanth asked if there is a way to automate the copying of macros from one workbook to another. It seems that Sreekanth has to create a new "distribution" workbook each month that contains a PivotTable that analyzes data, and the workbook needs to contain certain macros.

Perhaps the easiest way to do this is to create a new Excel template that contains only the macros you want to distribute. Then, you can use that template as a basis for your distribution workbook. Simply copy your PivotTable to the workbook, and it will be ready to distribute, as needed.

You could also, if desired, created an Excel add-in that contains the macros you want. (How you create add-ins is discussed in other ExcelTips.) You could then send the add-in to all recipeints of your distribution workbook and ask them to install the add-ins on their system.

If you would rather not use a template or mess with an add-in, then you can create a macro that will copy macro procedures from one workbook to another. Such a macro can get rather involved, and would take some testing. A good place to start in developing such a macro is a great online resource located at this Web page:

http://www.cpearson.com/excel/vbe.aspx

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11655) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Automating Copying Macros.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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