Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Conditionally Deleting Rows.

Conditionally Deleting Rows

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 31, 2016)

2

When you are working with data tables containing information that you received from another person, you may want to prune the amount of data in the table by deleting rows if a particular condition is met. There are several ways you can approach such a task.

The first method is to use Excel's AutoFilter feature. This works particularly well if you have a rather simple criteria by which to delete rows. When you turn on the AutoFilter, Excel places pull-down buttons at the right side of each cell in the data table's header row. Using these pull-down buttons you can specify the records you want displayed. You should select a filter value that will result in displaying only those rows you want to delete. With those rows displayed, you can select them and use the ribbon tools to get rid of the rows. When you turn AutoFilter off, then you are left with only the rows you wanted.

Another method involves the use of macros to do the deleting for you. This approach works well if you have to perform the deletions on lots of data, or if you do it quite often. The following macro can delete rows based on a key value:

Sub DeleteRows()
    Dim strToDelete As String
    Dim rngSrc As Range
    Dim NumRows As Integer
    Dim ThisRow As Integer
    Dim ThatRow As Integer
    Dim ThisCol As Integer
    Dim J As Integer
    Dim DeletedRows As Integer

    strToDelete = InputBox("Value to Trigger Delete?", "Delete Rows")
    Set rngSrc = ActiveSheet.Range(ActiveWindow.Selection.Address)

    NumRows = rngSrc.Rows.Count
    ThisRow = rngSrc.Row
    ThatRow = ThisRow + NumRows - 1
    ThisCol = rngSrc.Column

    For J = ThatRow To ThisRow Step -1
        If Cells(J, ThisCol) = strToDelete Then
            Rows(J).Select
            Selection.Delete Shift:=xlUp
            DeletedRows = DeletedRows + 1
        End If
    Next J
    MsgBox "Number of deleted rows: " & DeletedRows
End Sub

To use the macro, select the range the key range that covers the rows you want checked. For instance, if the key to be checked is in column G, and you want to check rows 5 through 73, then you would select the range G5:G73. When you run the macro, it asks you what value it should check for. If any cells in the range G5:G73 contain the value you specify, the corresponding row for that cell will be deleted.

There are obviously other ways to delete rows based on a value. For a good selection of different methods, take a look at this page by Dave Hawley at Ozgrid:

http://www.ozgrid.com/VBA/VBACode.htm

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12256) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Conditionally Deleting Rows.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Changing Your Sound Theme

Don't like the sounds that Windows has chosen to play when system events occur? Here's how to change the sound theme that ...

Discover More

No More Custom Formats Can Be Added

If you make too many formatting changes to your workbook, you could end up with a situation where you cannot make any such ...

Discover More

Converting Numbers to Strings

VBA is great at working with both strings and numbers. At some point you may have a number you need to convert to a string. ...

Discover More

Program Successfully in Excel! John Walkenbach's name is synonymous with excellence in deciphering complex technical topics. With this comprehensive guide, "Mr. Spreadsheet" shows how to maximize your Excel experience using professional spreadsheet application development tips from his own personal bookshelf. Check out Excel 2013 Power Programming with VBA today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Using Slashed Zeroes

To reduce the chances of confusion in presenting data, some people like to use zeroes with slashes through them. If you fall ...

Discover More

Recording a Data Entry Time

When entering information in a worksheet, it is common to also note a date or time corresponding to the entry. There are ...

Discover More

Deleting Everything Up to a Character Sequence

Sometimes you have too much information in a cell and you need to "pare down" what is there to get to the info you really ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 7 + 6?

2017-01-01 18:50:29

Peter

Puru

Can't you just use a formula for sheet B

Type = then point to the first item on sheet 1 and press enter. The formula will look something like this =Sheet1!B2.

Then copy the fomula down until it returns zero. If you want to copy down further and not show the zeros use =IF(LEN(Sheet5!A3)=0,"",Sheet5!A3)



2017-01-01 03:11:39

Puru Ji

Hi,

I am contacting you in regards to solving my database issue.

I have a database of around 200 clients in Sheet-1 of excel with their details including name, address, contact number, address, zip, city, country. However in Sheet 2, I have a list of only emails with categories in columns - A, B & C.

I usually use Sheet-2 data of emails for sending my product prices every 15 days. The higher discounted price to category A, mid to Category-B, and then to C.

The last time when I had sent my emails I realized updating the database as some of the emails were bounced back. Hence I updated Sheet-2 where only emailer database is loaded. But I realised that I need to update my Sheet A also as Sheet-B data was taken from Sheet-A. This would be tedious loading of double work.

In this regard, can you please assist if I can change one email in Sheet-2, then it automatically changes the same in Sheet-A too.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Regards,
Puru Ji


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.