Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Transposing and Linking.

Transposing and Linking

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 5, 2018)

1

You may already know that you can transpose information by using the Paste Special abilities of Excel. The information that is pasted is not dynamic, however. In some instances it might be nice to have the transposed information always reflect what is in the original, un-transposed information.

Here's a cool way to transpose information and have it linked to the original information:

  1. Figure out how many rows and columns are in your original information. For instance, if the original data is in the range A4:E10, then it has 7 rows and 5 columns.
  2. Select another place in the workbook (perhaps even on the same worksheet) that has the transposed number of rows and columns. For instance, if you are transposing A4:E10, you should select blank cells that consist of 5 rows and 7 columns.
  3. With the range still selected, click once in the Formula bar and type the following: =transpose(A4:E10). Make sure the address reflects the original data range you are transposing. If you are on a different worksheet, make sure you use an address that contains the worksheet name of your data, as in =transpose(Sheet1!A4:E10).
  4. Press Ctrl+Shift+Enter to signify to Excel that you are entering an array formula.

That's it. You've now got a dynamic transposed table, and any changes you make in the original are automatically reflected in the transposed version.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12614) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Transposing and Linking.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Superscript and Subscript at the Same Place

Do you want a superscript and subscript character to appear directly above each other without using the Equation Editor? ...

Discover More

Sheets for Months

One common type of workbook used in offices is one that contains a single worksheet for each month of the year. If you ...

Discover More

Get Rid of Web Stuff

When you copy information from a Web page and paste it into a worksheet, you can end up with more than you bargained for. ...

Discover More

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Calculating Statistical Values on Different-Sized Subsets of Data

Discovering different ways to analyze your data can be a challenge. Here's how to work with arbitrary subsets of a large ...

Discover More

Segregating Numbers According to Their Sign

Remember your number line from your early years in school? Some numbers can be below zero (negative numbers) and others ...

Discover More

Summing Based on Part of the Information in a Cell

Excel provides a variety of tools that allow you to perform operations on your data based upon the characteristics of ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is five more than 8?

2018-05-18 05:16:31

Thomas Papavasileiou

A small but i think helpful addition to the operation method is to copy the area to transpose dynamically, select any cell that will not intersect with your data and use the built in paste special transpose command. As the transposed area is already highlighted, with focus on the first cell of that area, type the proposed formula and ctrl+shift+enter.

By using this approach, you don't have to count the rows and columns of the area to transpose and you don't have to preselect the area where the result will appear.

Regards


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.