Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Transposing and Linking.

Transposing and Linking

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 21, 2016)

10

You may already know that you can transpose information by using the Paste Special abilities of Excel. The information that is pasted is not dynamic, however. In some instances it might be nice to have the transposed information always reflect what is in the original, un-transposed information.

Here's a cool way to transpose information and have it linked to the original information:

  1. Figure out how many rows and columns are in your original information. For instance, if the original data is in the range A4:E10, then it has 7 rows and 5 columns.
  2. Select another place in the workbook (perhaps even on the same worksheet) that has the transposed number of rows and columns. For instance, if you are transposing A4:E10, you should select blank cells that consist of 5 rows and 7 columns.
  3. With the range still selected, click once in the Formula bar and type the following: =transpose(A4:E10). Make sure the address reflects the original data range you are transposing. If you are on a different worksheet, make sure you use an address that contains the worksheet name of your data, as in =transpose(Sheet1!A4:E10).
  4. Press Ctrl+Shift+Enter to signify to Excel that you are entering an array formula.

That's it. You've now got a dynamic transposed table, and any changes you make in the original are automatically reflected in the transposed version.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12614) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Transposing and Linking.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 7 - 0?

2016-06-21 19:30:11

Thomson

You also can use it with Table function to reduce chance of address error, also easier if you put the transpose table in other worksheet.

=TRANSPOSE(YourTableName[#All])


2016-06-21 09:28:39

marjatta

Hello,

how about pasting links so that references become absolute. In a small table one can add $-signs but in a large one it is really a bother. In earlier laptops F4 provided a shortcut for this but for a few generation already that does not work.


2015-12-21 06:55:07

Amin

Thank so so so much! You are genius!


2015-10-30 06:02:23

Lawrence

This lesson was very helpful. Thank you very much!


2015-08-04 07:11:53

Mahesh

I am using EXCEL 2010
Following the above formula
the entire range returns #Value.
What wrong am I doing?
Please advise


2014-12-18 09:59:11

Ahmed Sherif

Brilliant... Saved my Day, and many days to come.. This has baffled me for years and had to do it today without workaround.


2014-09-19 11:06:06

Ken O\'Connor

Thanks so much! I knew there had to be a way!


2014-09-07 12:23:58

Michael Kolman

Hi,

Is there a way to change the direction of formulas autofill - so once I copy a formula downwards in a column it'll gather data from the consecutive cell to the right (in the adjacent column) and not the consecutive cell down (in the same column)??
Thanks!


2014-05-29 11:25:29

Nico Zavala

great!!!!! very useful for data tables, a time saver!!! thanks!!!


2013-11-04 06:19:14

Alan Dawes

This works well - many thanks.


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