Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Printing a Short Selection.

Printing a Short Selection

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 26, 2018)

2

You may have a need to periodically print only a portion of a worksheet. Excel allows you to print a selection by following these steps if you are using Excel 2007:

  1. Select the range that you want to print.
  2. Press Ctrl+P. Excel displays the Print dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Print dialog box.

  4. Make sure the Selection radio button is selected.
  5. Click on OK.

Microsoft dispensed with the Print dialog box beginning with Excel 2010; it is no longer the defacto way you start to print. If you are using Excel 2010 or a later version, follow these steps instead:

  1. Select the range that you want to print.
  2. Press Ctrl+P. Excel displays the Print controls on the File tab of the ribbon.
  3. Click the first button under the Settings heading and choose Print Selection. (You are indicating that you want to print only what you have selected.)
  4. Click on Print.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12619) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Printing a Short Selection.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is seven more than 1?

2018-05-26 11:58:02

James Woolley

@Gerd Schumann: In Excel, press F1, then type "protect" in the search box.


2018-05-26 05:48:23

Gerd Schumann

Many years ago we were using Quattro. The best feature was that with one shortcut command you could protect every formula on a spread sheet so that nobody could muck up your formulas (unless you knew the password established for this).
I have never been able to find this feature on Excel but still miss the good old days when I did not have to worry that someone would alter any formulas. Anything else was accessible to users to change anyway they liked.
Would you or anybody else be able to help with this?


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