Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Merging Many Workbooks.

Merging Many Workbooks

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 20, 2017)


Joy ran into a problem merging quite a few workbooks together. The majority of the workbooks—about 200 of them, all in a single folder—each contain a single worksheet, but some contain more. The worksheets forming each of these workbooks needs to be added to a single workbook.

The easiest way to do merges of this magnitude—particularly if you have to do it often—is with a macro. The following macro displays a dialog box asking you to select the files to merge. (You can select multiple workbooks by holding down the Ctrl key as you click each one.) It loops thru the list you select, opening each one and moving all its worksheets to the end of the workbook with the code.

Sub CombineWorkbooks()
    Dim FilesToOpen
    Dim x As Integer

    On Error GoTo ErrHandler
    Application.ScreenUpdating = False

    FilesToOpen = Application.GetOpenFilename _
      (FileFilter:="Microsoft Excel Files (*.xls?), *.xls?", _
      MultiSelect:=True, Title:="Files to Merge")

    If TypeName(FilesToOpen) = "Boolean" Then
        MsgBox "No Files were selected"
        GoTo ExitHandler
    End If

    x = 1
    While x <= UBound(FilesToOpen)
        Workbooks.Open FileName:=FilesToOpen(x)
        Sheets().Move After:=ThisWorkbook.Sheets _
        x = x + 1

    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
    Exit Sub

    MsgBox Err.Description
    Resume ExitHandler
End Sub

In the process of adding the worksheets to the end of the workbook, Excel will automatically append a (2), (3), etc. when duplicates worksheet names are detected. Any formulas in the book referring to other sheets will also be updated to reflect the new names.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12652) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Merging Many Workbooks.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...


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What is six more than 8?

2017-07-20 10:27:18

David Fox

One thing to look out for is assigned "variables" that might share the same name on each worksheet. Suppose cell A1 was given the name "Frequency" on the first worksheet, and all other worksheets to be added contained the same name. I've had to manually rename variables for each worksheet.

2013-05-28 13:01:07

Scott Renz

You could put:
Application.DisplayAlerts = False
at the beginning and put:
Application.DisplayAlerts = True
at the end and it won't display those warning messages.

2013-05-28 05:18:31


or of course you could use the brilliant DATAEXPLORER, a few bugs but even buggy for simply merging it's a joy. Only for 2010 +

2013-05-26 23:21:36

Lee, Jones

This marcho is great. However I meet a problem, there are lots of defined names within those excel files I want to merge. The consquence is that I have to press OK hundreds times to tell excel keeping use those definitions in order to complete the mergeing. Is there a way can solve this issue? Thanks a lot.

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