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Printing a Single Column in Multiple Columns

Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Printing a Single Column in Multiple Columns.

Sometimes the data you collect in a worksheet fits very nicely into a single column. For instance, you may have a list of names, and they all are contained in column A of your worksheet. When you choose to print the worksheet, it can consume quite a few pages, all of them nearly blank as the left side of each page contains a name, and the right side contains white space.

In this type of instance, it would be nice to print the single column as if it were multiple columns. That way you could use more of each printed page and fewer overall pages for your print job. Unfortunately Excel contains no intrinsic command or print setting that allows you to automatically reformat your data so it prints better. There are workarounds, however.

One workaround that is often overlooked is just copying the single-column list to a blank Word document. If you paste it there as plain text, you can format each page for multiple columns and actually print the information.

If you would rather not involve Word, you can cut and paste information from the first column into other columns to give the desired number of printing columns. This, of course, should be done in a new worksheet or workbook, so that the original data remains undisturbed. As an example, if you have 200 names in your original list, you can cut 40 names at a time from the list and paste them into columns A through E of a new worksheet. Printing this worksheet requires less pages than printing the original single-column worksheet.

Of course, if you have to do this cut-and-paste often, the chore can quickly become tiresome. In this instance, you can use a macro that does the exact same thing: It slices and dices the original list and pastes it into a number of columns on a new workbook.

Sub SingleToMultiColumn()
    Dim rng As Range
    Dim iCols As Integer
    Dim lRows As Long
    Dim iCol As Integer
    Dim lRow As Long
    Dim lRowSource As Long
    Dim x As Long
    Dim wks As Worksheet

    Set rng = Application.InputBox _
      (prompt:="Select the range to convert", _
      Type:=8)
    iCols = InputBox("How many columns do you want?")
    lRowSource = rng.Rows.Count
    lRows = lRowSource / iCols
    If lRows * iCols <> lRowSource Then lRows = lRows + 1

    Set wks = Worksheets.Add
    lRow = 1
    x = 1
    For iCol = 1 To iCols
        Do While x <= lRows And lRow <= lRowSource
            Cells(x, iCol) = rng.Cells(lRow, 1)
            x = x + 1
            lRow = lRow + 1
        Loop
        x = 1
    Next
End Sub

When you run this macro, you are asked to select the range you want to convert, and then you are asked to specify the number of columns you want it to be reformatted as. It creates a new worksheet in the current workbook and copies information from the original into as many columns as you specified.

For additional resources to solve this problem, refer to the following Web sites:

http://www.ozgrid.com/VBA/MiscVBA.htm#Print
http://dmcritchie.mvps.org/excel/snakecol.htm

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (8239) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Printing a Single Column in Multiple Columns.

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Comments for this tip:

Dennis Costello    04 Apr 2016, 09:13
One could also create, in the recommended separate tab or workbook, a flock of link formulae - =tab!A1, =tab!A2, =tab!A3, etc. in column A, =tab!A61, =tab!62, etc. in column B.

To keep it a bit neater, you could expand the formulae a bit to
=if(isempty(tab!a1), "", tab!a1)

One could also of course expand on the notion to include the column header, too - all that is left as an exercise for the reader, who can "season to taste".
Dennis Costello    04 Apr 2016, 08:57
I'm not sure of the context where you're using the string "[V1][AD68]", but it sounds like you want to specify a Print Area. The easy way to do that is to select the range you want to print, and then click Page Layout -> Print Area -> Set Print Area.

If you're trying to do this in VBA, by specifying the value for a worksheet property, use the string "V1:AD68" to specify the range.
Richard T. Prinzing    03 Apr 2016, 15:52
I want to print, on my Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, boxes V 1 through AD 68 ONLY. When I attempt to print these spaces, I receive the message "Integer is not valid" with an [OK] underneath.

How do I print just those columns? I have tried [V1] [AD68], [V 1] [AD 68], and [V,1] [AD,68] to no avail. I even punched in the "print what" section the "selection" rather than the "entire workbook."

How do I print just those nine columns?

















 
 

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