Closing Up Cut Rows

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 8, 2017)

6

Linda often cuts and pastes information from one place to another in her workbook. If she cuts a row from one place and pastes it in another, the information is moved but the space for the original row remains in the worksheet. Linda wonders if there is a way that when she cuts and pastes the rows "close up" at the point where she cut the row.

Actually, there are a few ways you can accomplish this task, and all of them are very easy. Let's say, for example, that the rows you want to cut are rows 2 through 4. You want to paste them just before row 12. Select rows 2 through 4 and press Ctrl+X, like normal. (This puts the "marching ants" around those rows.) Next, select cell A12 or select all of row 12—it doesn't matter. Press Shift+Ctrl+=, and the rows are moved to just before the currently selected cell or cells. No data is lost, and the original rows are closed up, just as desired.

The other approach is handy if you are more comfortable using the mouse. Again select rows 2 through 4 and press Ctrl+X. Now, right-click on cell A12 so that Excel displays a Context menu. One of the choices you'll see on the menu is Insert Cut Cells. Choose this option, and the rows are moved from their old location to just before cell A12. Just like in the other approach, the original rows are closed up.

A third approach is to use drag-and-drop editing. If you select the original rows (2 through 4), you can hold down the Shift key as you drag the rows to their desired location. When you release the mouse button, the rows are moved and the space they previously occupied is closed up.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2078) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Automatically Capitalizing Day Names

Type the name of any of the seven days into your document, and Word automatically makes sure it is capitalized. This is done ...

Discover More

Hash Marks Displayed Instead of Cell Contents

Have you ever entered information in a cell only for it to appear as hash marks? This tip explains why this happens, how you ...

Discover More

Making Suggestions to Microsoft about Word

Got an idea for making Word a better program? Microsoft wants to hear from you and has created a website to solicit your ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Highlighting the Rows of Selected Cells

If you lose your place on the screen quite often, you might find it helpful to have not just a single cell highlighted, but ...

Discover More

Selecting Noncontiguous Ranges with the Keyboard

It's easy to select non-contiguous ranges using the mouse, but may seem more daunting if you are simply using the keyboard. ...

Discover More

Automatically Adding 20% to an Entry

When you are developing a worksheet for others to use, you may want to have entries in a particular cell (or cells) be ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 3 + 8?

2017-07-10 14:34:19

Rhonda

Same question as Graham and Craig (and original Help Wanted):
If I cut a row from worksheet A and paste it on worksheet B, when I go back to worksheet A there is a blank row left behind which now must be deleted. I'm sure there is a macro solution for this but I'm wondering if instead there is a setting in Excel that could be used?


2017-07-10 03:51:43

Mark Galloway

An alternative to "Shift+Ctrl+=" is Ctrl + <"+" on numeric keypad>


2017-07-09 07:09:29

Peter Atherton

Graham, Craig

If you select both sheets, select 1st, hold shift select 2nd. Then select rows to delete


2017-07-08 13:45:18

Craig

These methods seem to be only for data on the same sheet (or perhaps for rows only). Is there also a way to close cut columns from sheet A to sheet B?

Thanks!


2017-07-08 13:20:50

S Vijay Krishna

Hi Allen

I follow another approach to for "closing up" rows and columns while cutting data in excel. Use Shift + Space to select row or Ctrl+space to select a column,then Ctrl+x to cut it,then move on to the desired column or row and press Ctrl and "+" (Ctrl+"+").


2017-07-08 09:35:37

Graham

These options all work if the rows are moved within a single WORKSHEET.

However, implied by the question is a requirement to move the rows to another Worksheet within the current Workbook. In this situation the blank rows are left behind in the initial Worksheet.

When moving to a different Worksheet, I do not know of an easy way to automate the 'Closing Up' of the cut rows. Maybe a macro is needed?


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.