Closing Up Cut Rows

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 8, 2017)

6

Linda often cuts and pastes information from one place to another in her workbook. If she cuts a row from one place and pastes it in another, the information is moved but the space for the original row remains in the worksheet. Linda wonders if there is a way that when she cuts and pastes the rows "close up" at the point where she cut the row.

Actually, there are a few ways you can accomplish this task, and all of them are very easy. Let's say, for example, that the rows you want to cut are rows 2 through 4. You want to paste them just before row 12. Select rows 2 through 4 and press Ctrl+X, like normal. (This puts the "marching ants" around those rows.) Next, select cell A12 or select all of row 12—it doesn't matter. Press Shift+Ctrl+=, and the rows are moved to just before the currently selected cell or cells. No data is lost, and the original rows are closed up, just as desired.

The other approach is handy if you are more comfortable using the mouse. Again select rows 2 through 4 and press Ctrl+X. Now, right-click on cell A12 so that Excel displays a Context menu. One of the choices you'll see on the menu is Insert Cut Cells. Choose this option, and the rows are moved from their old location to just before cell A12. Just like in the other approach, the original rows are closed up.

A third approach is to use drag-and-drop editing. If you select the original rows (2 through 4), you can hold down the Shift key as you drag the rows to their desired location. When you release the mouse button, the rows are moved and the space they previously occupied is closed up.

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Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is six minus 6?

2017-07-10 14:34:19

Rhonda

Same question as Graham and Craig (and original Help Wanted):
If I cut a row from worksheet A and paste it on worksheet B, when I go back to worksheet A there is a blank row left behind which now must be deleted. I'm sure there is a macro solution for this but I'm wondering if instead there is a setting in Excel that could be used?


2017-07-10 03:51:43

Mark Galloway

An alternative to "Shift+Ctrl+=" is Ctrl + <"+" on numeric keypad>


2017-07-09 07:09:29

Peter Atherton

Graham, Craig

If you select both sheets, select 1st, hold shift select 2nd. Then select rows to delete


2017-07-08 13:45:18

Craig

These methods seem to be only for data on the same sheet (or perhaps for rows only). Is there also a way to close cut columns from sheet A to sheet B?

Thanks!


2017-07-08 13:20:50

S Vijay Krishna

Hi Allen

I follow another approach to for "closing up" rows and columns while cutting data in excel. Use Shift + Space to select row or Ctrl+space to select a column,then Ctrl+x to cut it,then move on to the desired column or row and press Ctrl and "+" (Ctrl+"+").


2017-07-08 09:35:37

Graham

These options all work if the rows are moved within a single WORKSHEET.

However, implied by the question is a requirement to move the rows to another Worksheet within the current Workbook. In this situation the blank rows are left behind in the initial Worksheet.

When moving to a different Worksheet, I do not know of an easy way to automate the 'Closing Up' of the cut rows. Maybe a macro is needed?


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