Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Days Left in the Year.

Days Left in the Year

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 6, 2019)

4

Do you ever need to figure out how many days are left in the current year? Since Excel stores dates as serial numbers—making them easy to subtract—it is easy to put together a formula that will return the number of days left in the year:

=DATE(YEAR(C12),12,31)-C12

This formula assumes that the date you want to analyze is in cell C12. It uses the DATE function to calculate the serial number for the last day of the year (December 31), and then subtracts the serial number for the actual date. The result is the difference—the number of days—between the two dates.

If you want to find the days left in the year from today, you don't need to put a date into a cell. You could use this formula:

=TEXT(DATE(YEAR(TODAY()),12,31)-TODAY(),0)

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (6147) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Days Left in the Year.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is five minus 0?

2019-07-10 03:45:39

SteveJez

Jim,
Or a simple formula.
=NETWORKDAYS.INTL(TODAY(),"31-12-"&YEAR(NOW()),1,Hols)

The formula has 4 arguments, 2 of which a optional. 1st is the start date, 2nd is the end date, 3rd is the w/e combination for your work pattern (see Figure 1 below) & 4th is a list of non working days - other than w/e's (national holidays).
You could just as easily refer to cells for, either or both, arguments 1 & 2 and enter dates you are interested in. (see Figure 2 below)

HTH

Figure 1. w/e pattern

Figure 2. Formula


2019-07-09 15:13:44

Harold Druss

Jim
How about a macro?
======================================
Sub BusinessDaysLeftInYear()
Dim iYear As String, iTarget As Date, j As Long

iYear = year(Now)
iTarget = "12/31/" & iYear

For i = 0 To iTarget - Now
Select Case Weekday(Now + i)
Case 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
j = j + 1
End Select
Next

MsgBox "Business Days left in this year: " & j

End Sub


2019-07-09 10:29:00

Greg renigar

This is a good tip. People might be interested in this reconfigured for fiscal year.


2019-07-08 12:04:34

Jim

Is there a formula to find out how many business days are left (Monday through Friday?)


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