Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Changing Axis Tick Marks.

Changing Axis Tick Marks

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 25, 2015)

2

If you use an Excel chart type that uses axes, you may have noticed the presence of "tick marks" on one or all of the axes. Tick marks are used to indicate a major or minor demarcation along an axis. For instance, if you have an axis that ranges from 0 to 1000, there may be major tick marks at every 100 in the range, and minor tick marks at every 50.

Excel normally sets up the tick marks for you, but you can change the way they appear by following these steps if you are using Excel 2007 or Excel 2010:

  1. Right-click on the axis whose tick marks you want to change. Excel displays a Context menu for the axis.
  2. Choose Format Axis from the Context menu. (If there is no Format Axis choice, then you did not right-click on an axis in step 1.) Excel displays the Format Axis dialog box.
  3. Make sure the Axis Options tab is selected. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Axis Options tab of the Format Axis dialog box.

  5. To the right of Major Unit, click Fixed and specify a multiple at which you want the major tick marks to appear.
  6. To the right of Minor Unit, click Fixed and specify a multiple at which you want the minor tick marks to appear.
  7. Click on OK.

The steps in Excel 2013 are largely identical, except that you end up working with the Format Axis task pane instead of the Format Axis dialog box.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (6211) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Changing Axis Tick Marks.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is three minus 2?

2016-04-25 19:22:53

Elmarie Kaufman

I have a file of 43K+ lines of data (electric usage by qtr hour) and have created a “month” designation in a column to the right of the data – with just one entry corresponding to the first line of data on the first day of each month. I am able to graph this data with the month labels presenting correctly if I designate the line numbers, but in a dynamic chart, although they will appear, they are not aligned to the data. All the month labels are jammed up on the left side of the xaxis (occupying perhaps a quarter of the xaxis length) while the rest of the axis is unlabeled. I have checked the dynamic axis label definition and it shows correctly when clicked on in the edit – but they just won’t display correctly on the graph. What is wrong? - See more at: http://ksrowell.com/blog-visualizing-data/2011/10/03/aligning-labels-with-tick-marks/#comment-13482


2016-01-29 09:01:14

J59

Dear Allen,

I have a question which also concerns the tick marks in my graph. I have multi-category labels in my graph, but when I plot the graph the bars that are generated are not aligned in the middle of the associated term. It seems Excel distributes all bars along some kind of gradient. This results in the most left category with a bar on the left, the bar slowly moving to the middle in the middle of the graph and ending up on the right side at the last category (on my right hand). I can't find anywhere on how to align the bars properly so they are evenly distributed (exactly above their term). Could you help me out? Kind Regards,

Tim


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