Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Taking a Picture.

Taking a Picture

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 30, 2019)

3

Excel provides a nifty little tool that allows you to create a picture from a range of cells, from a chart, or from another object in your worksheet. Follow these steps if you are using Excel 2007:

  1. Select the cells or other object you want a picture of. (If you select cells, they must be contiguous.)
  2. Display the Home tab of the ribbon.
  3. Click the down arrow under the Paste tool in the Clipboard group. Excel displays a list of options.
  4. Click As Picture to display a submenu.
  5. Click Copy as Picture. Excel displays the Copy Picture dialog box.
  6. In the top part of the dialog box, specify what you want in the picture.
  7. In the bottom part of the dialog box, specify how you want the graphic saved.
  8. Click OK.

The steps you follow in Excel 2010 and later versions are a bit different:

  1. Select the cells or other object you want a picture of. (If you select cells, they must be contiguous.)
  2. Display the Home tab of the ribbon.
  3. Click the down arrow to the right of the Copy tool in the Clipboard group. Excel displays a list of options.
  4. Click Copy as Picture. Excel displays the Copy Picture dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  5. Figure 1. The Copy Picture dialog box.

  6. In the top part of the dialog box, specify what you want in the picture.
  7. In the bottom part of the dialog box, specify how you want the graphic saved.
  8. Click OK.

The result is that you now have a graphic in the Clipboard—either a metapicture or a bitmap, depending on your choice in the bottom portion of the dialog box—that you can paste anywhere. Paste it in another workbook, paste it in an e-mail, or paste it in a Word document. You can paste it just about anywhere because it is no longer an Excel object, but an actual graphic.

You should know that if you choose "As Shown On Screen" in the Copy Picture dialog box, that doesn't mean that Excel copies the picture exactly as shown. The copied picture will always be at a 100% zoom magnification, regardless of what zoom setting you are using. Thus, if you are viewing your worksheet at 125% zoom, take a picture of some cells and then paste the picture back into the workbook. It will look smaller than the rest of your workbook because of how the picture is captured.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (6240) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Taking a Picture.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is four more than 3?

2019-07-31 03:02:30

MalR

Great tip. I usually use the Snipping Tool but this works well with Excel. Good point Mike. Makes it more flexible.


2019-07-30 10:36:46

Mike S.

On 'Taking a Picture' - Copy your cells, open Paint, Select Paste. Save as JPEG, BMP etc. Use anywhere.


2016-04-07 07:57:48

stefano Cianchi

Simply it has nothing to do with windows 10. No options displayes below "paste" . You (and me) are a victims of the creative complexitiy and instability of microsoft.


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