Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Setting Row Height.

Setting Row Height

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 27, 2016)

2

Excel normally sets the height of rows within your worksheet to reflect the size of the largest font used on the row. You can, however, adjust the height of the row to any size desired. For instance, you might want to add additional space before a row. Rather than insert a blank row, you can increase the height of the row so it has blank space before it.

The easiest method for adjusting row height is to use the mouse. All you need to do is move the mouse pointer into the row header area (the gray area at the left of the row). When you move the pointer so it is over a dividing line between rows, it changes shape to a double-headed arrow. When the mouse pointer is this shape, you can click on the left mouse button, hold it down, and drag the border to a new position. When you release the mouse button, the row is resized to the new height.

You can also adjust row height in this manner:

  1. Select any cell in the row you want to adjust. If you select a cell range that includes cells in multiple rows, you can adjust the row height for more than one row at a time.
  2. Display the Home tab of the ribbon.
  3. In the Cells group, click Format. Excel displays a selection of choices.
  4. Click Row Height. Excel displays the Row Height dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  5. Figure 1. The Row Height dialog box.

  6. Adjust the value in the dialog box to reflect the desired row height.
  7. Click on OK.

The value shown in the dialog box (step 5) represents the current height of the selected row, in points. A point is equal to approximately 1/72 inch; it is the measurement unit used for fonts.

A third way to change the row height is a mash-up of the two presented already. Move the mouse pointer into the row header area (the gray area at the left of the row). Right-click and you'll see a Context menu appear. From the Context menu choose the Row Height option, and Excel displays the Row Height dialog box previously discussed.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (6293) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Setting Row Height.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Printing without Headings

The writer uses headline styles to create a story outline. He does not want to see the headlines when he prints the story. ...

Discover More

Protecting Your Revisions

Want to protect your documents so that people can't edit them without you knowing about it? One way is to make sure that the ...

Discover More

Macro, while Running, Stops Excel from Responding

When running a macro, have you ever seen Excel appear to stop responding? This can be frustrating, but there are a couple of ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Changing Width and Height to Inches

Want to set the width and height of a row and column by specifying a number of inches? It's not quite as straightforward in ...

Discover More

Formatting Subtotal Rows

Excel automatically formats subtotals for you. But what if you want to change the default to something more suitable for your ...

Discover More

Increasing Row Height for Printing

You may have a need to increase the height of the rows in your worksheet to "spread out" the data when it is printed. This ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 7 - 1?

2016-08-29 17:42:17

Peter

Chuck's tip is a big time saver. You can also save time by selecting multiple row or column headers and then drag the row or column separator (the double arrow) of any of the selected headers to the desired height or width. All selected rows or columns will receive the associated height or width.
If you doubleclick the row/column separator of any of multiple selected headers all rows or columns will get the exactly the height or width of the longest value in each row or column.


2016-08-29 08:05:41

Chuck

One I use often if you want to resize so all the contents of the cell are visible is to move the cursor to the double arrow on either the row or column heading and double click.


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.