Properties for Worksheets

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 13, 2019)

1

Laurie knows how to view properties of an Excel workbook. What she would like to do, however, is to view similar properties relative to individual worksheets. For instance, she wonders if there is a way to view properties such as date created, date modified, author, or "last modified by" for individual worksheets.

Unfortunately, Excel doesn't keep track of such information for worksheets. The only workaround we've been able to figure out is to develop your own record of information about the worksheets in the workbook. An obvious way to do develop a Workbook_SheetChange event handler. The following is an example of one you could add to the ThisWorkbook object in the Visual Basic Editor:

Private Sub Workbook_SheetChange(ByVal ws As Object, ByVal Target As Range)
    Dim s As Worksheet
    Dim J As Integer
    Dim FoundIt As Boolean

    On Error Resume Next
    Set s = Worksheets("Stats")
    On Error GoTo 0
    Application.EnableEvents = False
    If s Is Nothing Then
        ' Stats worksheet did not exist
        Set s = Worksheets.Add(After:=Worksheets(Worksheets.Count))
        s.Name = "Stats"
        s.Range("A1") = "Worksheet"
        s.Range("B1") = "Creator"
        s.Range("C1") = "Last Modified"
        s.Range("D1") = "Modifed By"
        
        With s.Range("A1:D1")
            .Font.Bold = True
            .Borders(xlEdgeBottom).LineStyle = xlContinuous
            .Borders(xlEdgeBottom).Weight = xlThin
        End With

        s.Range("A2") = s.Name
        s.Range("B2") = s.CustomProperties.Creator
        s.Range("C2") = Format(Now, " mm/dd/yyyy  hh:mm am/pm")
        s.Range("D2") = Application.UserName
    End If
    J = 2
    FoundIt = False
    While (s.Cells(J, 1) <> "")
        If s.Cells(J, 1) = ws.Name Then
            FoundIt = True
            s.Cells(J, 3) = Format(Now, " mm/dd/yyyy  hh:mm am/pm")
            s.Cells(J, 4) = Application.UserName
        End If
        J = J + 1
    Wend
    If Not FoundIt Then
        ' Worksheet name not found
        s.Cells(J, 1) = ws.Name
        s.Cells(J, 2) = ws.CustomProperties.Creator
        s.Cells(J, 3) = Format(Now, " mm/dd/yyyy  hh:mm am/pm")
        s.Cells(J, 4) = Application.UserName
    End If
    ws.Activate
    Application.EnableEvents = True
End Sub

The event handler is triggered anytime you make a change in the workbook. It first checks to see if there is a worksheet named Stats. If not, then the worksheet is created, and some rudimentary information is added to it. The handler looks in the Stats worksheet to determine if the data there includes a row for the worksheet on which a change occurred. If not, then a row is added, but if so, the information in the row is updated.

The handler only tracks four pieces of information—the worksheet name, the creator, the date the last change was made, and the user name of who made the change. (The Creator property indicates a numeric value related to the program that created the worksheet. It isn't terribly helpful for humans, and I included it as an illustrative example of how information can be stored.)

Remember, this is only a workaround and you should consider carefully what type of information you want to track for your worksheets. You can then modify the code to reflect that desire.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (7542) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is nine less than 9?

2019-04-15 04:45:47

David Shepherd

The current user's username can be captured using the Environ function:

Dim sName As String

sName = Environ("UserName")


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