Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Retrieving Worksheet Names.

Retrieving Worksheet Names

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 21, 2017)

3

If you have a very large number of worksheets in a workbook, you might want to retrieve the names of those worksheets and put then on their own worksheet. For instance, you may want them in one place so you can use them in a table of contents or in some other fashion. The following macro, GetSheets, will quickly retrieve the names of the worksheets in the current workbook and put them in the current workbook, beginning at whatever cell is currently selected.

Sub GetSheets()
    Dim w As Worksheet
    Dim iRow As Integer
    Dim iCol As Integer

    iRow = Selection.Row
    iCol = Selection.Column
    For Each w in Worksheets
        Cells(iRow, iCol) = w.Name
        iRow = iRow + 1
    Next w
End Sub

If you want to make an actual table of contents where the sheet names are actually hyperlinks to the worksheets, you could modify the macro in the following manner:

Sub MakeTOC()
    Dim w As Worksheet
    Dim iRow As Integer
    Dim iCol As Integer
    Dim sTemp As String

    iRow = Selection.Row
    iCol = Selection.Column
    For Each w in Worksheets
        Cells(iRow, iCol) = w.Name
        sTemp = "'" & w.Name & "'!A1"
        ActiveSheet.Hyperlinks.Add Anchor:=Cells(iRow, iCol), _
          Address:="", SubAddress:=sTemp, TextToDisplay:=w.Name
        iRow = iRow + 1
    Next w
End Sub

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11679) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Retrieving Worksheet Names.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Spacing Table Rows Vertically

Want to get just the right amount of spacing above and below text in a table cell? A very easy way to do this is to adjust ...

Discover More

Determining an ANSI Value in a Macro

Need to know the character code used for a particular character? In a macro you can use the Asc function to determine the ...

Discover More

Widening Multiple Columns Proportionally

It is easy to adjust the width of columns in Excel. It is much harder to adjust the width of a range of columns ...

Discover More

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Shifting Objects Off a Sheet

One day you are just editing your worksheet like you normally do, then you see an error that says "Cannot shift object off ...

Discover More

Creating a Worksheet Copy by Default

Excel makes it relatively easy to copy worksheets to a different workbook. That doesn't mean it couldn't be made simpler ...

Discover More

Determining a Worksheet's Number

When you add a new worksheet to a workbook, it receives a meaningful name such as "Sheet4" or "Sheet17." If you want to ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 3 + 8?

2017-01-23 10:47:30

Dave

Mary Beth,

Allen's instructions as you noted are actually VBA code. They are what you would use to write a macro to do the task for you.

If you are relatively new to Excel, or if you are a light Excel user, then you can and should probably ignore tips that look like these.

On the other hand, if you are or are becoming a serious Excel user, then learning how to write macros can give you many more tools than you ever thought possible, particularly with repetitive tasks.

Learning to write macros is not that hard (I'm self-taught), but it requires a small base of core knowledge. Once acquired, you'd be good to learn to do -- and actually do -- anything you want. Fortunately, there are many resources available online and in books to get you over that initial hump. Excel VBA Programming for Dummies by John Walkenbach comes to mind.

Good luck!


2017-01-23 09:41:41

Mary Beth

Are these your directions?
Sub MakeTOC()
Dim w As Worksheet
Dim iRow As Integer
Dim iCol As Integer
Dim sTemp As String
I do not understand your directions. They make no since.


2017-01-21 04:57:43

Najm

Dear brother,
You really help people do better.
Thanks sharing....
Najm


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.