Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Hiding a Hyperlink on a Printout.

Hiding a Hyperlink on a Printout

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 19, 2016)

2

Kathy has a hyperlink in cell A1 of every worksheet in her workbook. The hyperlink, when clicked, displays a worksheet that contains a table of contents so she can move around the enormous workbook faster. Kathy doesn't want to print the hyperlink when she prints the worksheets. She wonders if there is any way to format the hyperlink so it doesn't print. She notes that hiding column A or row 1 defeats the purpose because she wants this cell visible while working in the workbook.

There are many ways you can go about this. Perhaps the easiest way is to just "hide" the information in cell A1 so it is not visible and won't print out. One way to do this is to format the text in the cell as white, since white-on-white is quite invisible. The link would still be there and could easily be clicked, but it wouldn't be visible.

A similar result can be had by applying a custom format to the cell. Just use the format ";;;" (that's three semicolons, without the quote marks) and the information in the cell disappears from view. Again, you can still click the link, even though it is quite invisible.

Another way to approach the problem is to define print areas for each of your worksheets. Just exclude the first row of each worksheet from the print area, and it will never show up on the printout. The added benefit to this approach is that the hyperlink is still visible on each worksheet.

You could also put your hyperlink into a text box instead of cell A1. The text box could then be formatted so that it doesn't print. (Select the text box, right-click and choose Size and Properties, display the Properties tab, and uncheck the Print Object check box.)

Another approach is to not use hyperlinks in your worksheets, but instead add a form button that, when clicked, runs a macro that takes the user to the main worksheet. (How you create form buttons has been discussed in other issues of ExcelTips.) Form buttons aren't included when you print your worksheets.

A rather unique approach is to use Microsoft Word to help you create the link. You can, in Word, create a hyperlink and then format that hyperlink as Hidden text. (How you format Hidden text can be found on the WordTips website.) Then, copy the text of the link to the Clipboard and paste it into Excel as a Word object. The object can then retain the features of Word—including the text being hidden—and still be "clickable" in Excel.

Finally, you could use macros to facilitate printing your worksheets. Add the following macro to the ThisWorkbook object:

Private Sub Workbook_BeforePrint(Cancel As Boolean)
    Dim wks As Worksheet

    For Each wks In Worksheets
        wks.Range("A1").NumberFormat = ";;;"
    Next
End Sub

All this does is to apply, to all the worksheets in the workbook, the special custom format described earlier in this tip. The macro is automatically run just before printing. After printing the formatting is still in the worksheets. You can then include a second macro to apply the General format to cell A1 in the workbook being activated:

Private Sub Workbook_SheetActivate(ByVal Sh As Object)
    Sh.Range("A1").NumberFormat = "General"
End Sub

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (8186) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Hiding a Hyperlink on a Printout.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Trimming Spaces from Strings

Need to get rid of extraneous spaces before or after the text in a string? VBA provides three different functions you can use ...

Discover More

Fixing the Decimal Point

Don't want to always type the decimal point as you enter information in a worksheet? If you are entering information that ...

Discover More

Sorting Conditional Formats Properly

Conditional formatting can be a great tool to get your data looking just the way you need. However, when you sort data that ...

Discover More

Save Time and Supercharge Excel! Automate virtually any routine task and save yourself hours, days, maybe even weeks. Then, learn how to make Excel do things you thought were simply impossible! Mastering advanced Excel macros has never been easier. Check out Excel 2010 VBA and Macros today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Easily Printing to PDF

It used to be quite difficult to produce a PDF file from an Excel workbook. Times change, though, and you now have a variety ...

Discover More

Printing Odd or Even Pages

When you print a worksheet, Excel normally prints all the pages or a consecutive series of pages that you specify. If you wan ...

Discover More

Printing a Draft of a Worksheet

Do you want the absolute fastest print speed possible for a worksheet? Then you need to print a worksheet draft.

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is three minus 2?

2016-07-20 04:16:44

Terence

You could also create a 'control panel' on the contents page. Use conditional formatting to hide or show the hyperlinks based on whether the control panels is show or hide.I use this approach for highlighting input fields.


2016-07-19 09:14:35

Col Delane

Another even simpler approach to one only briefly mentioned in the Tip is to create a simple one line macro that activates the Contents sheet, and assign this procedure to a macro button on the Quick Access Toolbar, where the button is only available in the designated workbook. This completely removes the navigation "tool" from all worksheets thus solving Kathy's problem, whilst it remains accessible from anywhere in the workbook rather than just when cell A1 is visible.


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.