Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Using SUM In a Macro.

Using SUM In a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 25, 2016)

5

Bob has a need to use the SUM function in a macro in order to find the sum of all the values in a column. The problem is that the number of cells to be summed will vary; for one run of the macro it could be 100 cells, while on the next it could be 300 and on the third only 25.

First, it is easy to use most worksheet functions (such as SUM) from within a macro. All you need to do is to preface the function name with "Application.WorksheetFunction." or simply "WorksheetFunction." Thus, if you know that each run of the macro will require summing A1:A100, then A1:A300, and finally A1:A25, you could use a macro like this:

Public Sub Sum_Demo()
    Dim myRange
    Dim Results
    Dim Run As Long

    For Run = 1 To 3
        Select Case Run
        Case 1
            myRange = Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("A1", "A100")
        Case 2
            myRange = Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("A1", "A300")
        Case 3
            myRange = Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("A1", "A25")
        End Select
        Results = WorksheetFunction.Sum(myRange)
        Range("B" & Run) = Results
    Next Run
End Sub

This macro uses a For . . . Next loop to specify different ranges of cells to be summed. It then uses the SUM worksheet function to assign the sum to the Results variable, which is (finally) stuffed into a cell in column B. The results of the first run are put in B1, the second in B2, and the third in B3.

While this particular macro may not be that useful, it shows several helpful techniques, such as how to define a named range, how to use the SUM function, and how to stuff the sum into a cell. What the macro doesn't do is to show how to select a variable number of cells to be summed. To do this, it is best to rely upon the End method of the Range object. The following code line shows how you can stuff the sum of the range starting at A1 and extending to just before the first blank cell in the column:

myRange = ActiveSheet.Range("A1", Range("A1").End(xlDown))
Range("B1") = WorksheetFunction.Sum(myRange)

Note that a range (myRange) is defined as beginning with A1 and extending through whatever the End method returns. This is then summed and stuffed into B1.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9180) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Using SUM In a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is six more than 7?

2016-10-25 12:23:19

Thomas Papavasiliou

If Bob wants to use the Sum function for all the values of column “A” regardless of their number, a very simple method is to use an empty cell (in the example, cell D1) and use the code:

Cells(1, 4) = Application.WorksheetFunction.Sum(Columns(1))


2014-04-14 09:00:55

Jeff

FYI, Jim's first method assumes there are no blank cells within the range of cells to be summed. See the Range.End property.


2014-04-14 07:38:58

Jim

Linda,

Here is a formula that one would use to NOT make an absolute reference. Notice the "-10" would ONLY count 10 rows above where the "R7C" makes E7 the top of the column no matter how many rows are involved.

ActiveCell.FormulaR1C1 = "=SUM(R[-10]C:R[-2]C)"

Hope this helps.


2014-04-13 11:04:14

Linda W

Jim - How does the $ get in the formula?


2014-04-13 10:18:01

Jim Sweet

Here's how I do it. To sum values dynamically from cell E6 to bottom of column no matter how many rows there are (using relative references)

Sheet1.Select
Range("E6").Select
Selection.End(xlDown).Select
ActiveCell.Offset(2, 0).Range("A1").Select
ActiveCell.FormulaR1C1 = "=SUM(R7C:R[-1]C)"

The resultant formula is: =SUM(E$7:E23)

Notice that "E$7" is to make absolute reference for first number in column.


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