Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Defining Shortcut Keys for Symbols.

Defining Shortcut Keys for Symbols

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 27, 2015)

6

John uses Excel to keep a maintenance log. He frequently needs to add a symbol from the Insert Symbol dialog box. He'd like to assign the symbol to a shortcut key (it doesn't have one already), but cannot find a way to do it.

Some symbols have obvious shortcut keys, defined by the folks in Redmond. One of the lesser-known facts is that every symbol has a "shortcut" key, but using that shortcut may not seem that short. How does this work? By holding down the Alt key as you type the ASCII or ANSI code for the symbol.

For instance, let's say you want to enter the cents symbol. If you display the Insert Symbol dialog box and select the cents symbol, at the bottom right of the dialog box you can see the character code for the symbol (it is 00A2). This is a hexadecimal number; you need to convert it to regular decimal notation. You can do this by using the formula =HEX2DEC("00A2"), which returns the value 162. If you remember this code, you can hold down the Alt key as you type the code, with a leading zero, on the numeric keypad.

This approach works great if you only need to input a few symbols on a regular basis; it doesn't take much work to remember those few codes you need. However, if you have a lot of symbols you need to work with, then remembering codes becomes more problematic. You could develop your own printed "cheat sheet" for the symbols so that you can refer to it all the time, or you could rely on Excel's AutoCorrect feature to do the remembering for you. Follow these steps:

  1. Use the Insert Symbol dialog box to insert the symbol into a cell.
  2. Select the cell that contains the symbol.
  3. Press F2 to start editing the cell.
  4. Select the symbol, and only the symbol.
  5. Press Ctrl+C to copy the symbol to the Clipboard.
  6. Display the Excel Options dialog box. (In Excel 2007 click the Office button and then click Excel Options. In Excel 2010 and Excel 2013 display the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  7. At the left side of the dialog box click Proofing.
  8. Click AutoCorrect Options. Excel displays the AutoCorrect dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  9. Figure 1. The AutoCorrect tab of the AutoCorrect dialog box.

  10. In the Replace field, type a short mnemonic for the symbol. This should be a series of letters that are not a real word, such as hrt, which might be the mnemonic for a heart symbol.
  11. In the With field press Ctrl+V to paste the symbol from the Clipboard.
  12. Click OK.

Now you can just type the mnemonic when you want the symbol to appear. When you type the space bar after the mnemonic, AutoCorrect kicks in and replaces it with the symbol.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9332) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Defining Shortcut Keys for Symbols.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is three more than 8?

2017-04-05 10:15:34

Terry Norris

This shortcut works only if the symbol is in one of the standard alphabets. It doesn't work if the symbol is in wingdings. In that case, you have to format the cell for wingdings before the symbol appears. That's an extra step that takes the "short" out of shortcut.


2017-04-04 09:38:23

Brandon

Brilliant! (in best Guinness beer commercial voice)


2016-02-19 13:13:51

Dave Hedberg

This does not work for the checked box. It gives me some other symbol. Can we enter the hex or the decimal value into the (replace) With: field instead of copying and pasting?


2015-07-21 20:45:02

Peter Atherton`

Susan

The second item was a squareroot symmbol


2015-07-21 20:43:16

Peter Atherton

Susan

The problem with inserting a symbol is that the symbol will usually come a different font.

Insert a few characters (I used the Sigma sign, and the checkbox ) for testing

Copy the code below into the VB editor, select the symbols and run the code.

Sub CharacterFont1()
Dim c As Range

For Each c In Selection
MsgBox c.Characters(1).Font.Name & vbLf _
& Left(c, 1)
Next c

End Sub


The results where:
Calibri, S: (wrong font)
French Script, V:
Webdings, c

So any shortcut needs to change the font of the particular character.


2015-07-20 21:07:52

susan

this does not work for the tick symbol, because when you copy the symbol, its a capital P.


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