Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Excluding Zero Values from a PivotTable.

Excluding Zero Values from a PivotTable

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 13, 2017)

5

William has a PivotTable based on parts drawn from a store for a particular piece of equipment. Some parts have not ever been drawn upon and hence the usage is zero. William wonders if there is a way to display in the PivotTable only parts with usage greater than zero.

There are a couple of ways you can handle this situation. One way, obviously, is to remove all the zero-value items from the data used to create the PivotTable. Another way is to go ahead and create the PivotTable, but then apply a filter to the PivotTable to remove those items with a zero value.

To apply an AutoFilter after the PivotTable is created, all you need to do is select the column to the immediate right of the PivotTable and then create the AutoFilter. (Create the AutoFilter as you normally would in your version of Excel.) Excel is smart enough to know that the AutoFilter should not apply to the blank column, but instead does its work on the rows that make up the PivotTable. Click the triangle to the right of the column on which you want to filter, then select Custom. You can then specify that the filter should only include items with a value greater than zero.

Another thing you can try is handy if the item you want to filter (in this case, the Parts field) is either a column field or a row field. Simply right-click the field after it is placed in the PivotTable and then choose Settings. You can then specify that you want a particular value (in this case, the value 0) omitted from the PivotTable.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9638) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Excluding Zero Values from a PivotTable.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is five minus 4?

2016-07-15 12:58:06

Mary

Thank you... This was a perfect solution!


2015-06-15 12:35:12

bmr

Well, this option just doesn't seem to work in Mac Excel 2008. What a bunch of junk. they always just show as zero.


2014-03-24 09:35:15

Bryan

I don't know that I agree with changing your source data. Often times a null (blank) value is distinctly different from a 0. Excel doesn't generally treat them differently, but that's because it's a spreadsheet program and not a database program. It depends on the circumstances and your specific data structure, of course.


2014-03-22 15:16:35

EC

Another way to achieve a "clean" report is to remove 0 values in the data table with "Ctrl H" and replace 0 with delete. Then go to the pivot table and right click in the pivot table - choose "PivotTable Options". In the tab "Layout and Format" check the box "For empty cells show:" and leave the specified cell blank.


2014-03-22 05:44:55

Carlo

Why do not you translate your products into other languages ​​(eg Italian) so that I can buy them? (excuse the errors in the English language).


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