Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Getting Rid of Workbook Links.

Getting Rid of Workbook Links

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 4, 2015)

Paula has a workbook that is linked to other workbooks. These are workbook links, not hyperlinks. She is looking for a way to break all of these types of links.

There are several ways you can approach such a task. One is to manually break the links by displaying the Data tab of the ribbon and clicking Edit Links in the Connections group. (If the Edit Links tool is not available, it means there are no links in the current workbook.) You can then select the links and click Break Link. You can even select all the links at once by creating a selection set (using Shift and Ctrl to compose the set) prior to clicking on Break Link.

If you prefer not to use the manual method, you can use a short macro to get rid of the links. The following is one example that will do the task:

Sub BreakLinks()
    Dim strLink
    For Each strLink In ActiveWorkbook.LinkSources
        ActiveWorkbook.BreakLink Name:=CStr(strLink), _
          Type:=xlExcelLinks
    Next strLink
End Sub

A third way to manage your links is to look to a third-party solution, such as FindLink or Name Manager. You can find them at the following page:

http://www.manville.org.uk/software/findlink.htm
http://www.jkp-ads.com/OfficeMarketPlaceNM-EN.asp

FindLink was written by Bill Manville and Name Manager by Jan Karel Pieterse, both Excel MVPs.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9903) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Getting Rid of Workbook Links.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Turning Off Automatic Hyphenation for Parts of a Document

Word can hyphenate documents automatically, if you want it to. But what about those situations where you want most of a ...

Discover More

Using Automatic Substitution

Using a tool called Automatic Substitution, Docs can quickly correct things you may incorrectly type. Here's the lowdown on ...

Discover More

Floating Information in a Frozen Row

You can freeze information in rows or columns using one of the built-in features of Excel. As you move up or down in the ...

Discover More

Program Successfully in Excel! John Walkenbach's name is synonymous with excellence in deciphering complex technical topics. With this comprehensive guide, "Mr. Spreadsheet" shows how to maximize your Excel experience using professional spreadsheet application development tips from his own personal bookshelf. Check out Excel 2013 Power Programming with VBA today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (RIBBON)

Tying a Hyperlink to a Specific Cell

Make a hyperlink to a cell in your workbook, edit the structure of that workbook a bit, and you may find that the hyperlink ...

Discover More

Removing Hyperlinks without a Macro, Take Two

Need to get rid of hyperlinks in a worksheet? Here's an easy way to do it without using a macro.

Discover More

Editing a Hyperlink

Excel will cheerfully keep track of all sorts of hyperlinks for you. If you want to change the hyperlink in some way, don't ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share