Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: References to Hyperlinks aren't Hyperlinks.

References to Hyperlinks aren't Hyperlinks

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 3, 2019)

4

If you have a hyperlink in a cell (such as cell A1) and then you use a formula in another cell that references that hyperlink, the result of that formula is not a hyperlink. For instance, suppose cell B1 contains this simple formula:

=A1

The result of that formula will not be a hyperlink, even if cell A1 contains a hyperlink. The reason is that the formula extracts the value of the referenced cell, which is the text displayed in A1. If what is displayed in cell A1 is a URL, then you could modify your formula just a bit to result in a hyperlink:

=HYPERLINK(A1)

If cell A1 does not contain a URL, or if it is a hyperlink where the displayed text is different than the underlying URL, then the HYPERLINK function won't work as expected.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9603) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: References to Hyperlinks aren't Hyperlinks.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is eight minus 8?

2019-06-02 09:32:36

Ihuda Bunzl

hi,
I have a similar problem $L$281 16:21
K L M
FALSE
FALSE
FALSE
TRUE go

this last line shows K281 and L281 cells where L281 shows the friendly name of this hyperlink: =IF(K281=TRUE,HYPERLINK(A281&".htm","go"),"")
J1 has this $L$281 caused by this formula because I need the hyperlink to be there, =IF(K281=TRUE,HYPERLINK(A281&".htm","go"),"") can you help me to make J1 run the hyperlink in any cell where the friendly name is "go"? if I click on cell 281 I get the hyperlink working well.
thanks



2019-03-14 09:11:08

swaps

But is there a solution to it, I mean hyperlinking the cell with the same link from original cell it is referring to.


2017-04-03 11:49:50

Andy Fine

This doesn't work for me if the original hyperlink is given a "friendly name". I have a file linked hyperlinked in cell A1 in one sheet, with a "friendly name" for the link. I want another cell to reference that sheet, so that it also takes you to the same file. Simply copying wouldn't be helpful. When you do =hyperlink (A1), you get a hyperlink with the "friendly name" listed. This causes the link to think the file name is actually "friendly name" when it is something else, causing it to not find the file.


2015-08-16 20:03:25

Gino

Thanks mate.....your article helped end hours of frustration. What I don't understand is why wouldn't Microsoft make this feature default, i.e. If you reference a cell that is a hyperlink then show the damn hyperlink; and make the user turn off the default if that's not what you want.

Gino


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