Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Determining "Highest Since" or "Lowest Since".

Determining "Highest Since" or "Lowest Since"

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 26, 2020)

Alex routinely analyzes the latest building industry data and needs to write articles about the data. Frequently he needs to highlight some new piece of data, such as "industrial building construction was the lowest since August 2019." Alex wondered if there was a way to automate this type of highlighting; if column A contains the month and year and column B contains the values for those periods, Alex would like a formula in column C that indicates "this value is the highest since April 2019" or "this value is the lowest since November 2016."

Assuming that the month and year listed in column A is really an Excel date value (and not text), you can easily create a formula to return the desired information. If you have row 1 occupied with headings for your columns, enter the following in cell C2:

=IF(ROW(B2)=2,"",IF(B2>MAX($B$1:B1), "this value is 
the highest since " & TEXT(INDEX($A$1:A1,MATCH(MAX(
$B$1:B1),$B$1:B1,0)), "mmmm yyyy"), IF(B2<MIN($B$1:B1),
"this value is the lowest since " & TEXT(INDEX($A$1:A1,
MATCH(MIN($B$1:B1),$B$1:B1,0)), "mmmm yyyy"),"")))

Remember that this is a single formula and should be entered all on one line. You can copy the formula down as many rows as necessary in column C, and it should provide the desired information. It only makes a notation in column C if the value in column B is greater than the maximum or less than the minimum of all the foregoing values in column B.

If you have quite a bit of data in your worksheet, you could notice that the formula results in long recalculation times. If this is the case, then you may want to consider using a macro that will do the desired analysis and provide the appropriate information. The following macro looks backward through the information in column B and provides both a "lowest since" and "highest since" result in columns C and D.

Sub FindHiLow()
    Dim orig_cell As Range
    Dim orig_val As Integer
    Dim orig_row As Integer
    Dim rownum As Integer
    Dim newcell As Range
    Dim new_val As Integer
    Dim lowrow As Integer
    Dim hirow As Integer

    Set orig_cell = ActiveCell
    orig_row = ActiveCell.Row
    orig_val = orig_cell.Value

' find lowest
    lowrow = 0
    For rownum = orig_cell.Row - 1 To 1 Step -1
        Set newcell = Cells(rownum, 2)
        new_val = newcell.Value
        If orig_val >= new_val Then
            lowrow = rownum
            Exit For
        End If
    Next
    If lowrow = 0 Then lowrow = 1
    Cells(orig_row, 3).Value = "Lowest since " & Cells(lowrow, 1)

' find highest
    hirow = 0
    For rownum = orig_cell.Row - 1 To 1 Step -1
        Set newcell = Cells(rownum, 2)
        new_val = newcell.Value
        If orig_val <= new_val Then
            hirow = rownum
            Exit For
        End If
    Next
    If hirow = 0 Then hirow = 1
    Cells(orig_row, 4).Value = "Highest since " & Cells(hirow, 1)
End Sub

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (10183) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Determining "Highest Since" or "Lowest Since".

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Stepping Through Head Formats

You can use the shortcuts described in this tip to quickly change the heading levels of the headings in your document. ...

Discover More

Merging Table Cells

Want to create cells that span multiple columns or multiple rows? You do this in Word by merging cells together. Here's ...

Discover More

Replacing Spaces in Part Numbers with Dashes

Word has a power capability to search for information and then replace that information in some way. Finding the right ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Counting Odds and Evens

If you have a series of values in a range of cells, you may wonder how many of those values are even and how many are ...

Discover More

Outlining Cells Referenced in a Formula

When you are editing a formula, Excel helpfully outlines the cells referenced in the formula. If you want this capability ...

Discover More

Counting Names Based on Two Criteria

Need to figure out how many rows in a worksheet meet two criteria that you specify? Here's how to get the info you desire.

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] (all 7 characters, in the sequence shown) in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is one more than 7?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.