Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Microsoft 365. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Offering Options in a Macro.

Offering Options in a Macro

Written by Allen Wyatt (last updated February 9, 2023)
This tip applies to Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Microsoft 365


7

If you are just starting out developing macros, you may be looking for a simple way to offer a set of choices to a user, and then take an action based on the user's response. This is a relatively simple task, if you use the InputBox function along with a Select Case structure.

The first task is to set up your InputBox so it displays the information to the user. For example, let's say you have five options and you want the user to select one option from those five. You can use the following code to put together five options, each on their own line:

Prompt = "1. This is your first choice" & vbCrLf
Prompt = Prompt & "2. This is your second choice" & vbCrLf
Prompt = Prompt & "3. This is your third choice" & vbCrLf
Prompt = Prompt & "4. This is your fourth choice" & vbCrLf
Prompt = Prompt & "5. This is your fifth choice"

You can now use the Prompt string when you invoke the InputBox function in your macro. You then translate what the user responds with into a number that represents their choice from your five options. The code to do this is as follows:

UserResp = InputBox(Prompt, "The Big Question")
UR = Val(UserResp)

In this example, the response from the InputBox function is assigned to the UserResp variable, which should be a string. The UR variable, which is a numeric, is then set based on the value of the string. (The Val function returns the value in a string.)

The only thing left to do is to take an action based on which number was chosen, 1 through 5. You can use the Select Case structure to do this. The full subroutine could appear as follows:

Sub Macro1()
    Dim Prompt As String
    Dim UserResp As String
    Dim UR As Single

    Prompt = "1. This is your first choice" & vbCrLf
    Prompt = Prompt & "2. This is your second choice" & vbCrLf
    Prompt = Prompt & "3. This is your third choice" & vbCrLf
    Prompt = Prompt & "4. This is your fourth choice" & vbCrLf
    Prompt = Prompt & "5. This is your fifth choice"
    UR = 0
    While UR < 1 Or UR > 5
        UserResp = InputBox(Prompt, "The Big Question")
        UR = Val(UserResp)
    Wend
    Select Case UR
        Case 1
            'Do stuff for choice 1 here
        Case 2
            'Do stuff for choice 2 here
        Case 3
            'Do stuff for choice 3 here
        Case 4
            'Do stuff for choice 4 here
        Case 5
            'Do stuff for choice 5 here
    End Select
End Sub

Notice that this example uses a While ... Wend loop around the InputBox function. This is done to make sure that the user enters a number between 1 and 5. If the value entered is outside that range, then the user is simply asked again.

Note:

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ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11059) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Microsoft 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Offering Options in a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is seven more than 6?

2023-02-10 09:55:14

J. Woolley

@Tomek, Brian
I often use vbNewLine: Chr(13) + Chr(10) or, on the Macintosh, Chr(13). Platform-specific new line character; whichever is appropriate for current platform.


2023-02-09 22:26:37

Tomek

@Brian:
Theoretically there are three VBA constants:
vbCr - carriage return = Chr(13)
vbLf - line feed =Chr(10)
vbCrLf - combination of the two above in that order.

Currently in Windows environment there is very little difference if you use any of them in your code, except, maybe, if you output to an external binary file. Historically, they were relevant to typewriters and early computer consoles.

If you use any with MsgBox in the prompt you will get the same result for each of them, and in MsgBox Title they are all ignored.
If you use them to add text to your document, whichever you use will be converted to the end-of paragraph mark (essentially equivalent to Chr(13).
From what I have seen most people would use vbCrLf.

It may be different on the Mac.


2023-02-09 13:08:55

Kiwerry

P.S. The appearance of the code on the site turned out to be as intended.
The hard-space character code only looks strange in the comment input box.


2023-02-09 12:38:07

Kiwerry

Thanks to Allen, and to Willy Vanhaelen for his comments. I built on these to make the interface slightly more user friendly by offering an explanation of what is required and showing what was entered. I also changed the Msgboxes to make them transient. The following code worked as expected on my W10/MS 365 machine, but comes with no guarantees...

Note: The code contains hard spaces in an attempt to preserve the indentation. If the nbsp; strings (including the preceding&) are copied into your VBA module unchanged, simply replace them all with ordinary space characters.

'============================================================================================================
Private Sub User_Choice_Example2()
'https://excelribbon.tips.net/T011059_Offering_Options_in_a_Macro.html _
    Comment on 2019-01-20 13:45:08 by Willy Vanhaelen _
    Amended CvZ
'============================================================================================================
Dim WshShell
Set WshShell = CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
Dim BtnCode, The_Text, Delay_Secs, The_Title, The_Type

Dim Prompt As String
Dim UserResp As String
' Get user choice
    Prompt = _
    "1. This is your first choice" & vbCrLf & _
    "2. This is your second choice" & vbCrLf & _
    "3. This is your third choice" & vbCrLf & _
    "4. This is your fourth choice" & vbCrLf & _
    "5. This is your fifth choice"
    Do
        UserResp = InputBox(Prompt, "The Big Question")
        Select Case UserResp
        Case ""
            MsgBox "Exiting at your request"
            Exit Sub
        Case "1", "2", "3", "4", "5"
            Exit Do
        Case Else
            MsgBox "Valid responses are 1 or 2 or 3 or 4 or 5" _
                & vbCrLf & "You entered: " & UserResp
        End Select
    Loop Until InStr("1×2×3×4×5×", UserResp & "×") '0 if not found
' Use user choice
    Delay_Secs = 2
    The_Text = "You chose "
    The_Title = "Transient box, self-destruct in " & Delay_Secs & " seconds."
    The_Type = 64
    
    Select Case UserResp
    Case "1"
        'replace with your code
        WshShell.Popup The_Text & "Choice 1", Delay_Secs, The_Title, The_Type
    Case "2"
        'replace with your code
        WshShell.Popup The_Text & "Choice 2", Delay_Secs, The_Title, The_Type
    Case "3"
        'replace with your code
        WshShell.Popup The_Text & "Choice 3", Delay_Secs, The_Title, The_Type
    Case "4"
        'replace with your code
        WshShell.Popup The_Text & "Choice 4", Delay_Secs, The_Title, The_Type
    Case "5"
        'replace with your code
        WshShell.Popup The_Text & "Choice 5", Delay_Secs, The_Title, The_Type
    End Select
    
    Set WshShell = Nothing

End Sub


2023-02-09 06:51:05

Brian

Is vbCrLf preferred to vbCrLf? Is there any difference? I suppose for that matter Chr(10)?


2019-01-21 13:02:10

Preston

Thanks for this tip, Mr. Wyatt! Never thought to use the InputBox that way--simple but elegant. Nice.


2019-01-20 13:45:08

Willy Vanhaelen

The While ... Wend loop used in this tip's macro is obsolete and is still maintained in vba only for backward compatibility. It is better coding practice now to use Do ... Loop.

The While ... Wend loop in this macro has also 2 flaws.
1) The InputBox has an OK and Cancel button but if you click the Cancel button, the input box is displayed again. So if the user changes its mind or realizes he runs the macro by mistake, he has no possibility to quit the macro.
2) If you enter i.e. 2.2 or a letter the macro should display the input box again because it is an illegal entry but instead it doesn't do anything and stops.

Here is my (slightly simplified) version that deals with these flaws:

Sub Macro1()
Dim Prompt As String
Dim UserResp As String
Prompt = _
"1. This is your first choice" & vbCrLf & _
"2. This is your second choice" & vbCrLf & _
"3. This is your third choice" & vbCrLf & _
"4. This is your fourth choice" & vbCrLf & _
"5. This is your fifth choice"
Do
UserResp = InputBox(Prompt, "The Big Question")
If UserResp = "" Then Exit Sub
Loop Until InStr("1×2×3×4×5×", UserResp & "×")
Select Case UserResp
Case "1"
MsgBox "choice 1" 'replace with your code
Case "2"
MsgBox "choice 2" 'replace with your code
Case "3"
MsgBox "choice 3" 'replace with your code
Case "4"
MsgBox "choice 4" 'replace with your code
Case "5"
MsgBox "choice 5" 'replace with your code
End Select
End Sub


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