Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Offering Options in a Macro.

Offering Options in a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 2, 2017)

2

If you are just starting out developing macros, you may be looking for a simple way to offer a set of choices to a user, and then take an action based on the user's response. This is a relatively simple task, if you use the InputBox function along with a Select Case structure. The first task is to set up your InputBox so it displays the information to the user. For example, let's say you have five options and you want the user to select one option from those five. You can use the following code to put together five options, each on their own line:
Prompt = "1. This is your first choice" + vbCrLf
Prompt = Prompt + "2. This is your second choice" + vbCrLf
Prompt = Prompt + "3. This is your third choice" + vbCrLf
Prompt = Prompt + "4. This is your fourth choice" + vbCrLf
Prompt = Prompt + "5. This is your fifth choice"
You can now use the Prompt string when you invoke the InputBox function in your macro. You then translate what the user responds with into a number that represents their choice from your five options. The code to do this is as follows:
UserResp = InputBox(Prompt, "The Big Question")
UR = Val(UserResp)
In this example, the response from the InputBox function is assigned to the UserResp variable, which should be a string. The UR variable, which is a numeric, is then set based on the value of the string. (The Val function returns the value in a string.) The only thing left to do is to take an action based on which number was chosen, 1 through 5. You can use the Select Case structure to do this. The full subroutine could appear as follows:
Sub Macro1()
    Dim Prompt As String
    Dim UserResp As String
    Dim UR As Single

    Prompt = "1. This is your first choice" + vbCrLf
    Prompt = Prompt + "2. This is your second choice" + vbCrLf
    Prompt = Prompt + "3. This is your third choice" + vbCrLf
    Prompt = Prompt + "4. This is your fourth choice" + vbCrLf
    Prompt = Prompt + "5. This is your fifth choice"
    UR = 0
    While UR < 1 Or UR > 5
        UserResp = InputBox(Prompt, "The Big Question")
        UR = Val(UserResp)
    Wend
    Select Case UR
        Case 1
            'Do stuff for choice 1 here
        Case 2
            'Do stuff for choice 2 here
        Case 3
            'Do stuff for choice 3 here
        Case 4
            'Do stuff for choice 4 here
        Case 5
            'Do stuff for choice 5 here
    End Select
End Sub
Notice that this example uses a While ... Wend loop around the InputBox function. This is done to make sure that the user enters a number between 1 and 5. If the value entered is outside that range, then the user is simply asked again.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (11059) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Offering Options in a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Maintaining Formatting when Inserting Documents

Word allows you to easily insert the contents of one document into another. Doing so, however, may result in unintended ...

Discover More

What Changes Did I Make In that Template?

When you make changes that affect a template, Word usually asks you if you want to save those changes when you exit the ...

Discover More

Changing Sort Order

When sorting information, Word follows some pretty strict rules. If you want to modify how those rules are applied, you may ...

Discover More

Solve Real Business Problems Master business modeling and analysis techniques with Excel and transform data into bottom-line results. This hands-on, scenario-focused guide shows you how to use the latest Excel tools to integrate data from multiple tables. Check out Microsoft Excel 2013 Data Analysis and Business Modeling today!

More ExcelTips (ribbon)

Page Numbers in VBA

When you print a larger worksheet, Excel breaks the printout across several pages. You may want to know, before you print, ...

Discover More

Getting User Input in a Dialog Box

Want to get some input from the users of your workbooks? You can do it by using the InputBox function in a macro.

Discover More

Copying Worksheet Code Automatically

When creating a workbook to be used by others, you may want any worksheets they add to the workbook to contain some special ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 3 + 8?

2017-11-06 10:33:11

Dave Bonin

Interesting... I had not seen the "+" plus character used as a concatenation operator in VBA.

I've always used "&" ampersand character for concatenation.

I did see a caution in the VBA Help, "When you use the + operator, you may not be able to determine whether addition or string concatenation will occur. Use the & operator for concatenation to eliminate ambiguity and provide self-documenting code."

It gets a little more complicated if one or both expressions between "+" signs is not a string. You might not always get what you want,


2017-05-01 23:26:15

Troy

Thanks Allen,
I am a long-time Excel user but never jumped into VBA much after having lots of errors that I couldn't debug some years ago. I have some basic macros for saving files and copying and refreshing different pivots, but I now want to make a user form for some employees to enter some order data. This would have a couple dependencies and options. Is there a way to practice this feature or to get a template to use.


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the ribbon interface (Excel 2007 or later)? This site is for you! If you use an earlier version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the menu interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.