Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Summing Digits in a Value.

Summing Digits in a Value

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 5, 2016)

2

If you have a cell that contains a value, you may want to devise a way to add together all the digits in the value. For instance, if a cell contains the value 554, you might want to determine the sum of 5+5+4, which is 14.

There are several ways you can approach this task. (Doesn't that always seem the way in Excel?) The first is to use a formula that relies on several functions:

=SUMPRODUCT(--MID(A1,ROW(INDIRECT("1:" & LEN(A1))),1))

This regular formula will sum the digits in any integer value (in cell A1) in a simple, elegant manner. This is not the only possible formula, however. The following is an array formula (terminated by pressing Ctrl+Shift+Enter) version of the same formula:

=SUM(1*MID(A1,ROW(INDIRECT("1:"&LEN(A1))),1))

Either of these formulas work fine if the value in A1 is a positive whole number. If there are any non-digit characters in the number (such as a negative sign or a decimal point), then the formulas return a #VALUE! error.

These are not the only formulas possible for this type of calculation. You can find some other examples of formulas in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=214053

You can also use a user-defined function to return the desired sum. The following macro steps through each digit in the referenced cell and calculates a total. This value is then returned to the user:

Function AddDigits(Number As Long) As Integer
    Dim i As Integer
    Dim Sum As Integer
    Dim sNumber As String

    sNumber = CStr(Number)
    For i = 1 To Len(sNumber)
        Sum = Sum + Mid(sNumber, i, 1)
    Next
    AddDigits = Sum
End Function

To use this function, just use a formula such as =AddDigits(A1) in a cell. An even more compact user-defined function (invoked in the same manner) is the following:

Function AddDigits(ByVal N As Long) As Integer
    Do While N >= 1
        AddDigits = AddDigits + N Mod 10
        N = Int(N / 10)
    Loop
End Function

Unlike the earlier macro, this version doesn't convert the cell contents to a string in order to process it. Instead, it steps through each digit of the value, stripping off the last digit and adding it to the total.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12002) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Summing Digits in a Value.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is seven more than 6?

2016-11-06 07:36:04

Michael (Micky) Avidan

The following Array Formula should fulfil the task (even for decimal and/or negative numbers):
=SUM(IFERROR(--MID(A1,ROW(INDIRECT("1:"&LEN(A1))),1),))
--------------------------
Michael (Micky) Avidan
“Microsoft® Answers" - Wiki author & Forums Moderator
“Microsoft®” MVP – Excel (2009-2017)
ISRAEL


2016-11-05 06:46:46

Willy Vanhaelen

Here is a user defined function that works with negative numbers and numbers with decimals as well:

Function AddDigits(Number As String) As Integer
Dim i As Integer, Char As String
For i = 1 To Len(Number)
Char = Mid(Number, i, 1)
If IsNumeric(Char) Then AddDigits = AddDigits + Char
Next
End Function


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