Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Displaying the Selected Cell's Address.

Displaying the Selected Cell's Address

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 1, 2017)

3

Excel allows you to easily see the location of the currently selected cell by examining the contents of the Name Box, to the left of the Formula Bar. This is fine and good, but there are times when you would like to have the address of a cell actually in a cell. For instance, you may want cell A1 to contain the address of the currently selected cell. This means that if cell E4 were selected, then A1 would contain its address, or $E$4. If you then pressed the right-arrow key, then the contents of A1 would change to $F$4.

You can grab the address of the currently selected cell by using the CELL worksheet function, in this manner:

=CELL("Address")

You should note that this function doesn't result in the contents of the cell changing every time you move to a different cell. Instead, the function is updated only when the workbook is recalculated, either by changing something in the worksheet or by pressing F9.

If, instead, you need to have "real time" reporting of the selected cell, you'll need to resort to using a macro. Follow these steps:

  1. Display the VBA Editor by pressing Alt+F11.
  2. In the Project window, at the left side of the Editor, double-click on the name of the worksheet you are using. (You may need to first open the VBAProject folder, and then open the Microsoft Excel Objects folder under it.)
  3. In the code window for the worksheet, click on the Object drop-down list and choose Worksheet. When you do, the Procedure should change to SelectionChange, and the framework for the event handler should appear in the code window.
  4. Change the event handler so it appears as follows:
  5. Private Sub Worksheet_SelectionChange(ByVal Target As Excel.Range)
        Range("A1").Value = ActiveCell.Address
    End Sub
    
  6. Close the VBA Editor.

Now, as you move about this single worksheet, the contents of A1 should be constantly updated to reflect your location.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12400) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Displaying the Selected Cell's Address.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 4 + 2?

2017-07-03 10:33:32

CJ

Yes, Micky, assuming you code that references the address property, but this isn't always true.


2017-07-03 03:32:03

Michael (Micky) Avidan

@Alex B,
No need to work so hard.
Just hover your cursor over the word "address" and you are set.
(see Figure 1 below)
(see Figure 1 below)
--------------------------
Michael (Micky) Avidan
“Microsoft® Answers" - Wiki author & Forums Moderator
“Microsoft®” Excel MVP – Excel (2009-2018)
ISRAEL

Figure 1. 


2017-07-02 05:03:12

Alex B

If you want to know the selected cell address while a macro is paused, you might just want to type
? ActiveCell.Address
into the immediate window. (? = print result to the immediate window).
This will work too if you just want to know where the cursor is right now, setting up the "=Cell" formula at this point would change the selected cell.


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