Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, Excel in Microsoft 365, and 2021. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Adjusting Row Height for a Number of Worksheets.

Adjusting Row Height for a Number of Worksheets

Written by Allen Wyatt (last updated February 24, 2024)
This tip applies to Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, Excel in Microsoft 365, and 2021


1

Ron knows how to adjust the height of a group of adjacent rows. What he doesn't know (and needs to) is how to make row heights the same across several worksheets in the same workbook.

The trick to this operation is to simply make sure that you select all the worksheets you want to affect. Take a look at the worksheet tabs at the bottom of the program window. You should see one for each worksheet in your workbook. If you want to affect the rows in a series of consecutive worksheets, click the tab for the first worksheet in the series and hold down the Shift key as you click the tab for the last. If the worksheets you want to affect are not consecutive, click the tab for one of the worksheets and then hold down the Ctrl key as you click on the tabs for each of the others.

With all the worksheets you want to affect selected, select the rows within the worksheet you can see. As you adjust the row height for those rows, Excel automatically adjusts the row height for the same rows in each of the other selected worksheets.

When you are done, click on a single worksheet tab. This cancels the selected set of worksheets, and you can continue to work as you desire. (If you don't cancel the selection set, then any changes you make on the screen continue to be made in all the selected worksheets.)

If you need to adjust row heights quite a bit, and your formatting is always the same, then you might benefit from having a macro to affect the sheets. The following macro steps through each selected worksheet and adjusts the height of rows 1 through 5. (You should obviously change the row height in the macro and the row numbers to reflect what you really need.)

Sub SetRowHeights()
    For Each w In Worksheets
        w.Rows("1:5").RowHeight = 25
    Next
End Sub

You can easily assign the macro to a shortcut key or the Quick Access Toolbar so it can quickly be executed.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12515) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, Excel in Microsoft 365, and 2021. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Adjusting Row Height for a Number of Worksheets.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is three less than 9?

2024-02-26 04:34:22

Michael van der Riet

Thank you Allen, after thirty years of Excel that was new to me. When designing a workbook I might create a template with for example the company name and address details, then copy the template fifty times to usable worksheets. Recently our company details changed slightly and I had so much housekeeping to do, changing every sheet in every book. If only I had known to select all and change only one sheet...


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