Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, and 2013. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Finding the Address of the Lowest Value in a Range.

Finding the Address of the Lowest Value in a Range

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 1, 2018)

2

When writing a macro, you can find the lowest value in a range of cells by using the WorksheetFunction method to apply the MIN worksheet function. You may need, however, to not only find the lowest value in the range, but also the address of the first cell that contains that value.

One simple way is to simply step through the range you want to examine and derive both the lowest value and the address of the cell being examined, as in the following:

Function FindLowestAddr(pRng As Range) As String
    Application.Volatile
    MinVal = pRng.Cells(1).Value
    MinAddr = pRng.Cells(1).Address
    For Each c in pRng
        If c.Value < MinVal Then
            MinVal = c.Value
            MinAddr = c.Address
        End If
    Next c
    FindLowestAddr = MinAddr
End Function

Note that this approach doesn't rely upon the MIN worksheet function at all. There is a drawback to it, however—it doesn't differentiate between cells that contain numeric values and those that don't. In other words, if the range passed to the function contains a blank cell, that cell is considered to contain a zero value, which may very well be the lowest value in the range.

One way around this is to rely upon worksheet functions from within the macro. The following macro uses both the MIN and MATCH worksheet functions to determine the location of the minimum value and then the index (offset) of that cell within the range.

Function GetAddr(rng As Range) As String
    Dim dMin As Double
    Dim lIndex As Long
    Dim sAddress As String

    Application.Volatile
    With Application.WorksheetFunction
        dMin = .Min(rng)
        lIndex = .Match(dMin, rng, 0)
    End With
    GetAddr = rng.Cells(lIndex).Address
End Function

It should be noted that if you are using the macro only to discover the address because you figured there was no way to derive the desired information without the macro, then you can do away with the macro entirely by using a worksheet formula. For instance, if you want to determine the address of the lowest-valued cell in the named range MyRange, you could use the following:

=ADDRESS(ROW(MyRange)+MATCH(MIN(MyRange),MyRange,0)-1,COLUMN(MyRange))

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12744) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Finding the Address of the Lowest Value in a Range.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is eight more than 0?

2018-01-01 11:19:10

Ron

I tried the worksheet formulas (one shown and Bryan's) and they work fine if the range is only in one column or one row. What if your range is a block of cells?


2013-11-25 08:29:07

Bryan

Neither macro should be volatile.

As for the worksheet version, you should ask yourself why you actually need the address, instead of a cell reference. If the address just gets fed into an INDIRECT function... you are doing it wrong.

If you actually do need to display the cell address, however, I think the following formula is more clear as to what is going on, as there's no addition or subtraction:

=CELL("address",INDEX(MyRange,MATCH(MIN(MyRange),MyRange,0)))

Since the INDEX/MATCH combination actually provides a cell reference and not the cell value, it can be used as an input to the CELL function.

Note, also, that none of these macros and formulas take into account the possibility of multiple minimum values (ties). You will have to decide based on what you are doing how to handle those types of results.


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