Rounding Up to a Value Ending in 9

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 7, 2013)

4

Bob performs calculations and wants to round the results up to the next value that ends in 9. In other words, to set a target retail price he wants to calculate the various costs and then round the answers up so that they end in 9. Thus, $1.42 rounds to $1.49, $1.49 has no change, $9.01 rounds to $9.09, etc.

There are actually quite a few formulas you can use to adjust your prices as you desire. Excel provides a good number of different rounding functions that can be tried. You might think that you could use a simple ROUNDUP function to do the work, as shown in the following:

=ROUNDUP(A1,1)-0.01

This won't work properly, however, if the value in A1 ends with a zero (1.00, 1.10, 1.20, etc.). In that case the formula simply subtracts 0.01 from the original value, converting 1.00 to 0.99, for instance.

The solution is to add 0.01 to the value in A1 before you do the rounding, in this manner:

=ROUNDUP(A1+0.01,1)-0.01

You can also use the CEILING function in almost the exact same manner as you did the ROUNDUP function:

=CEILING(A1+0.01,0.1)-0.01

A different (and shorter) approach, though, is to use the ROUNDDOWN function to do the rounding, in this manner:

=ROUNDDOWN(A1,1)+0.09

You could also use the straight ROUND function in this manner:

=ROUND(A1+0.05,1)-0.01

Shorter still is a solution that doesn't rely on any of the built-in rounding functions:

=(INT(A1*10)+0.9)/10

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12825) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, and 2013.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is nine more than 8?

2016-08-26 12:28:06

Gringo

Pretty useless guide, why wouldnt you cover both whole numbers and decimals?


2013-12-09 13:08:47

David

I've been doing this for years and never realized '.x0' would wind up rounding down. You create the '.x0' issue with numbers already ending in .09, but the net result will still be correct. It's just a few pennies, but they add up quickly, so thanks for the tip!


2013-12-09 11:32:24

Portia

Thank you, Allen!
Wonderful and useful tip.

Can you show a better way to copy a formula with the absolute sign$ in (ie A5*$N$5) to both rows and columns?
Thanks.


2013-12-08 17:01:08

Juan

Amazing tip, it will help me very much. Thank you very much!


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