Putting the Last Saved Date in a Cell

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 20, 2018)

2

Kimberly wonders if there is a formula she can use to put into a cell the date the workbook was last saved. Even if she opens the workbook every day, she only wants the date updated every time she chooses to save.

There is no formula to do this; Excel doesn't have the native capability. You can, however, create a simple macro that will stick a date value into a cell whenever you save the workbook. This is based on the BeforeSave event, which belongs to the ThisWorkbook object:

Private Sub Workbook_BeforeSave(ByVal SaveAsUI As Boolean, _
  Cancel As Boolean)

    Sheets(1).Range("A1").Value = Now()
End Sub

This macro places the date (actually, the value returned by the Now function) into cell A1 of the first worksheet in the workbook. That cell should be formatted within Excel to whatever format you desire. There is a potential drawback to this macro—if you use Save As (to save the workbook under a different name) and then choose to cancel the save, the date is still updated because it took place before the save—meaning, it took place just as Excel was starting to save the workbook, not after the workbook was actually saved.

It should be noted that Excel also includes an AfterSave event which you may be tempted to use to update information. It, unfortunately, has a few loopholes, as well, and offers nothing more foolproof than the BeforeSave event does.

If you prefer, you can use a slightly different macro-based approach. This one relies on a regular macro, not an event handler:

Function LastModified() As Date
    Application.Volatile
    LastModified = ThisWorkbook.BuiltinDocumentProperties("Last Save Time")
End Function

Within whatever cell you want the date to appear, you would call the macro in this way:

=LastModified()

The formula returns the date and time the workbook was last saved, and you can format it in any way desired. Since the function is noted as volatile, it is updated continuously, whenever the worksheet is recalculated.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (13575) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Excel in Office 365.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 3 + 4?

2018-10-22 16:36:24

Alex B

I personally would prefer to see Date Last Modified in the spreadsheet rather than date last saved and by adding an if statement to the "Sub" in the tip, the date will only update if excel thinks you have made changes (which is not foolproof.)

Private Sub Workbook_BeforeSave(ByVal SaveAsUI As Boolean, _
        Cancel As Boolean)

    If Not ActiveWorkbook.Saved Then
        'This workbook contains previously unsaved changes
        Sheets(1).Range("A1").Value = Now()
   End If
End Sub


2018-10-22 16:07:27

Roy

There is another tip on Mr. Wyatt's site at this URL: https://excel.tips.net/T002285_Displaying_the_Last_Modified_Date.html .

It begins:

"If you look at the properties stored with a workbook, you will notice that Excel maintains quite a bit of information concerning the file. One of the items is a date and time that is simply noted as "Modified." Many people refer to this as the "last modified" date, but it really reflects the last time the workbook was saved."

and continues in telling you how to get the date which "really reflects the last time the workbook was save" and put it in a page header.

Seems one could do that, except put it in the desired cell rather than a page header.


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