Resetting Default Names for New Worksheets

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 10, 2017)

Peter developed a macro that deletes all the worksheets in a workbook except for one named "Index." This macro works fine. However, after running the macro, if he adds a new worksheet he expects it to be named "Sheet1" as the default, but it is actually named a later number, such as "Sheet3" or "Sheet4." Peter wonders what is required to reset the sheet numbering to the expected default.

The easiest way to reset the sheet numbering is to simply close the workbook and open it again. That, however, involves a manual step on your part. If you are adding the new worksheets via macro, then you probably don't want to manually close and re-open the workbook.

You could, if desired, create a simple macro to do the close and re-open process. This will work as long as the macro is stored in your Personal Macro Workbook and not in the workbook you are closing.

Sub Reopen()
    Dim wb As Excel.Workbook
    Dim sPath As String

    Set wb = ThisWorkbook
    sPath = wb.FullName

    Application.OnTime Now + TimeValue("00:00:01"), _
      Application.Workbooks.Open(sPth)
    wb.Close (True)
End Sub

The macro determines the name of the current workbook and then sets an OnTime event to open the workbook 1 second in the future. During that 1 second, however, the workbook is closed and saved, which allows it to be re-opened successfully.

You could, if desired, also choose to add your new worksheets via macro. The following short macro adds a worksheet and then immediately renames it to the desired name.

Sub AddWs()
  Worksheets.Add after:=Sheets(Sheets.Count)
  Sheets(Sheets.Count).Name = "Sheet" & Sheets.Count - 1
End Sub

You'll want to play with these solutions and find which one works best for your needs, particularly if you are wanting to integrate the solution with an already existing macro.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (6103) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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