Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Using Multiple Print Settings.

Using Multiple Print Settings

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 8, 2017)

1

If you have multiple areas that you print in a worksheet, you may get tired of repeatedly specifying what area you want to print and then printing it. Such a task is well suited to being done with a macro. The macro can take care of specifying a print area and then actually printing the information.

For instance, let's assume that you have two print ranges defined in your worksheet: Range1 and Range2. Further, Range1 should be printed in portrait orientation and Range2 should be printed in landscape orientation. The following macros can be used to print each of the print ranges:

Sub PrintRange1()
    ActiveSheet.PageSetup.PrintArea = Range("range1").Address
    ActiveSheet.PageSetup.Orientation = xlPortrait
    ActiveWindow.SelectedSheets.PrintOut
End Sub
Sub PrintRange2()
    ActiveSheet.PageSetup.PrintArea = Range("range2").Address
    ActiveSheet.PageSetup.Orientation = xlLandscape
    ActiveWindow.SelectedSheets.PrintOut
End Sub

These are very simple macros, but you get the idea—all you need to do is set up the print job in the macro, and then print from the macro itself. You could even attach the macros to the Quick Access Toolbar or to a shortcut key, as described in other issues of ExcelTips.

If you prefer to not use macros, you could also use the custom views feature of Excel. Simply set the print area, orientation, margins, and other settings desired. Then define this as a custom view. To define a custom view, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure the View tab of the ribbon is displayed.
  2. In the Workbook Views group, click Custom Views. Excel displays the Custom Views dialog box.
  3. Click on Add. Excel displays the Add View dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Add View dialog box.

  5. Enter a descriptive name for the view you are defining.
  6. Make sure the Print Settings check box is selected.
  7. Click OK.

You can continue to define and save additional views, as desired. Your custom views are saved with your workbook, and you can later use them to print what you want. (Just display the custom view and then print your worksheet.)

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (6751) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Using Multiple Print Settings.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is eight more than 0?

2017-04-08 12:00:45

Novzar Dastoor

Custom Views, though a very nice feature, strangely doesn't work on Excel tables.


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