Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. If you are using an earlier version (Excel 2003 or earlier), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for earlier versions of Excel, click here: Moving and Copying Graphics Objects.

Moving and Copying Graphics Objects

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 23, 2017)

1

To move an object, click on one of the lines that make up the object. You should see handles (small boxes in Excel 2007, Excel 2010, or Excel 2013; small circles in Excel 2016) appear around the edges of the object. When the handles appear, point to one of the lines in the object—do not point to the handles. Click and hold down the mouse button and move the mouse. The object is dragged along with the mouse pointer. When you release the mouse button, the object stays at the new position.

When you want to copy a graphics object, select the object as already described. Then, press Ctrl+C to copy the object to the Clipboard. You can then press Ctrl+V to paste the object in the worksheet. You can then move the newly pasted object to where you want it to appear.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (7733) applies to Microsoft Excel 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Excel here: Moving and Copying Graphics Objects.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 0 + 7?

2017-09-26 12:59:09

Paul Harvitz

A faster way to copy an image is to hold down CTRL and click inside the object (you will see a "+" next to the pointer) and "move" the copy to where you want it in the spreadsheet.


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